Walsall man in service at the home of Lord Tredegar

Thanks to the Black Country Bugle for permission to use this article

 

Walsall man in service at the home of Lord Tredegar

By Black Country Bugle User  |  Posted: July 03, 2008

At the end of Queen Victorian’s reign, at the time of her death in 1901, it was recorded that there were 1.7 million women and 140,000 men still employed in domestic service. The great Victorian Age had given the upper and middle class levels of society a considerable amount of wealth, and the tradition of maintaining a house full of servants continued throughout the nineteenth century, and didn’t fall out of favour until after the First World War.

Almost every family history investigation reveals ancestors who were domestic servants at some stage in their lives, and in 1914 domestic service was still the largest single occupation for women. Houses of various sizes would employ as many servants as required to meet the needs and demands of the head of the household; the bigger the house the more servants there would have to be. It had always been the policy to employ new servants from locations at least 30 miles away, for it was feared by those who had the most to lose that younger servants especially might go running home at the first opportunity and spread unwanted gossip. To this end prospective employers advertised the positions available, rather than pass on any vacancies by word of mouth.

Prior to 1891 Frederick Tippett, a working class mon from Walsall, who may well have already been an experienced domestic servant, was hired to work at Tredegar House in Newport, South Wales, the home of Godfrey Morgan Lord Tredegar, a peer of the realm. He had joined a domestic army of 24 which included 15 women and nine men, living and working in the House. Eliza Cook was the housekeeper, a battle-axe of a woman in her sixties, who originally came from Swindon, Wiltshire. She had worked for the Morgans for years, and like so many domestics of her ilk had dedicated her life in service to others and was never married.

Eliza Cook may well have been the person who agreed to take Frederick on, as hiring and firing was one of her main duties. She was also a shrewd woman and didn’t necessarily employ girls who were too young or had no experience of domestic service at all.

In 1891 the youngest girls living and working at Tredegar House were Elizabeth Hillier aged 20 from Cardiff, and Mary Williams, also 20 from St David’s, Breconshire. The youngest male servant was Frank Sloman from Dorset, who was 19 years old.

Frederick Tippett was single [aged 30 in 1901 census] and although his job title isn’t known, he was most likely employed as a footman, with his duties clearly defined. He would have been a subordinate to the butler and if there was more than one footman, could have been placed in a ranking system according to height, size and good looks. Most were over six-feet tall, but additional inches could add additional income.

Often footmen were matched in size to maintain conformity in their joint appearance, and they were trained to act in unison. Frederick would have had a great many duties, ranging from seeing the head of the household and guests into their carriages on departure and receiving them on their arrival; polishing the household copper and plate; waiting at the table; and cleaning knives, cutlery, shoes and boots. Other duties at various times included trimming lamps; running errands; carrying coal; lighting the house at dusk; cleaning silver and gold; answering the drawing room and parlour bells; announcing visitors; waiting at dinner; attending the gentlemen in the smoking room following dinner; and attending in the front hall as guests were leaving. His uniform would have been white tie and tails with brass buttons that were most likely stamped with the Morgan family crest.

In 1891, the same time as our man from the Black Country was employed at Tredegar House, one of the servants wrote a letter to a friend, who was also a servant at a house in North Wales. Extracts from the letter give an indication of what the daily routine below stairs was like, particularly in the kitchen …
“There is a man in the kitchen who prepares and cooks all the meat, he’s the butcher. Then there is a man in the scullery, also a woman kept for washing up, and two still-room maids, and a woman comes every day to bake the bread. So there are five in the kitchen and two regularly in the scullery. I am afraid Miss Brown that sounds very much like a fairy tale, but when I tell you there are fourteen cold meats sent up every day for my Lord’s luncheon including four or five hot dishes, you will understand there is some work to be done in the kitchen alone. ”

For his service to Lord Tredegar, Frederick would have been paid £20 – £40 per annum, worked virtually every day from early morning till late at night, and only enjoyed some leisure time on a Sunday afternoon, or an occasional half day which was a reward if his work was deemed satisfactory and his behaviour conducted without blemish. Christmas at Tredegar House for Frederick would have been busier than ever. But come Twelfth Night he and the other servants would have been able to let their hair down and enjoy dancing and general merriment in the servants’ hall until the early hours. But woe-betide any who had too much to drink, for their duties started again at 6am the same morning.

Day Trip to Charlecote Park Warwick

DAY TRIP TUESDAY 13TH JUNE 2017

Our summer day trip this year is  to  Charlecote Park, Wellesbourne, Warwick. Charlecote Park has been the home of the Lucy family since the 13th century.   It is  a magnificent  Tudor  mansion  beside  the River Avon, on  the  foundations of  an  even earlier medieval house.

Queen Elizabeth I is known to have visited the house, and stayed in the chamber that now serves as the drawing room.

The Lucy family came to England as supporters of William the Conqueror, and the family has owned’land at Charlecote since 1247. Sir Thomas Lucy (1532-1600), the builder of the current house, was a magistrate under Elizabeth 1. In the course of his duties he was responsible for prosecuting local families with Catholic sympathies, including the Arden family, William Shakespeare’s maternal grandparents.

Tradition says that William Shakespeare was once caught poaching deer on the Charlecote Estate. This tale may well be true, as the estate lies close to Shakespeare’s family home at Stratford. The story goes that Shakespeare was forced to flee the area to avoid prosecution by Sir Thomas. The young playwright escaped to London and the rest, as they say, is history.

Eating and shopping: The Orangery serves a range of meals and light snacks. The Servants Hall gift shop and Pantry  shop  sell a range  of specific and  locally sourced produce.   Picnics welcome.

We will be leaving Tredegar House Car Park at 9.15am prompt. Arriving At Charlecote Park approximately 11.30am.

ADMISSION  PRICES –

  1. House and Garden including coach……………………………………..£24.60 each
  1. Coach only for National Trust members……………………………….£14.60 each

BOOK EARLY SO AS NOT TO BE DISAPPOINTED.

BALANCE REQUIRED NO LATER THAN_ 6 WEEKS PRIOR TO TRIP

3RD  MAY 2017.

Contact Judith Rice:

judith.rice@friends-of-tredegar-house.co.uk

Cyril Highman (1922 – 2016) Founder Member of Friends of Tredegar House

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Cyril Highman(1922 – 2016) – an   appreciation.

Cyril Highman, who died on 4th December 2016 after a long life well lived, was one of the founding committee members of the Friends of Tredegar House. He was a man of integrity, humour and kindness – and my uncle.

He began life in Tredegar and the family moved to Newport in 1932. Cyril attended Newport High School and at the age of 15 sat the  entrance exams for the Civil Service – something that his father decided would be a good career for him. It meant moving to London to take up employment in the Home Office. He would often talk about the fact that his father had decided his career. He had no complaints about that, saying that of course in those days a steady job, with a good retirement pension, was the dream of   many.

With the outbreak of the second world war, Cyril was keen to join up   and applied to the RAF to work as a radio mechanic. He was eventually released from his reserved occupation work at the Home Office in 1942. Most of his time in the RAF was spent at various stations in the UK working with radar, but his unit was sent to Germany at the end of the war. He was there for some months and the sights he saw made a very deep impression. He had loved German lessons while at school thanks to the teaching of Mr. Dawson and had had a German landlady  at the start of his working life in London.

On his return to the UK he was diagnosed with tuberculosis and was sent to the sanatorium at Cefn Mabley, where he spent 18 months and where he met his wife (also a patient), my father´s sister Betty, who was a Newport  girl.

 

September 24th 1949 Malpas Church

Fortunately, Betty and Cyril both recovered and they were married in 1949 at St. Marys Church Malpas, Newport.

Much of their married life was spent in Walton-­‐on-­‐Thames to accommodate Cyril working in London, but the pull of returning to Newport was too strong to resist when a job possibility arose for him. On his return to Wales, Cyril became involved in various societies. He was the secretary of the Newport Civic Society for many years and   both he and Betty were keenly involved in the Friends of Tredegar House from the very beginning of the Society. He was meticulous in keeping records for the Friends and was secretary for a number of years. He had always enjoyed learning about local history and put this interest to very good use with these societies. He was also one of the first supporters of the Ruperra Conservation Trust.

His fascination with technology – radar, hi-­‐fi equipment (building his own speakers at an early age) -­‐   also meant that he  was very  interested in computers. I remember that when he bought his first one he asked someone to come and tell him about the workings – and he meant  the  technical  workings  rather  than  how  to  operate  the machine! It was a wonderful form of communication for him in later years and he used to keep the family up to date with each other by passing on various emails we had written to   him.

We are fortunate that he decided to write his memoirs, (dealing with the years from 1922 – 1949)which make fascinating reading and are even more impressive as they were written when he was in his eighties without recourse to diaries or journals, which he never kept. He loved cycling, regarding it as one of the best forms of transport,   and his longest trip was from Barnes to South Wales over a period of two days in 1940. Music was another love, especially popular songs from the famous Big Band era of the 1940s.  He was a fine pianist himself. Cyril also enjoyed listening to Welsh hymn singing, no doubt due to his Methodist  background!

One of the letters of condolence after his death described him as a man with an ”historic memory, and a precise, properly concerned constitutionalist who would have made an excellent local government official”. In a way Cyril could be said to have taken on some of that  work in a voluntary fashion. Two examples are his involvement with   the Blue Plaques scheme for the Newport Civic Society and the fact     that he never feared to write to the South Wales Argus if he felt a point needed making.

His mental ability, kindness and humour were with him to the end. We will miss him!

Helen Davies

Many thanks to Helen for providing this lovely account of her uncle Cyril for Friends of Tredegar House

CPL Highman in Gatlow JUly 1946

Cpl. Highman in Gatlow July 1946

 

Friends of Tredegar House Talks 2017

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 2017 Talks

All talks & AGM will be held in
The Morgan Room at Tredegar House

PLEASE NOTE CHANGE OF TIMES
Entrance of £2.00 for members £3.00 for visitors

Wednesday 22nd February – 2 p.m.
Speaker – Rosemary Scadden
Subject – Welsh girls in Service between the wars

Wednesday 22nd March – 2 p.m.
Speaker – Sue Powell
Subject – My memories of Tredegar House

& surrounding area from 1945 – 2012

Wednesday 26th April – 7 p.m.
Speaker – Chris Barber
Subject – Journey around Monmouthshire

Wednesday 24th May – 7 p.m.
Speaker – Don Balkwill
Subject – Forgotten Gadgets

Wednesday 28th June – 7 p.m.
Speaker – Monty Dart
Subject – Leslie Thomas Newport author film of his early life in Newport

 Wednesday 26th July – 7 p.m.
Speaker – Graham Duke
Subject – Air Traffic Control

 Wednesday 27th September – 7 p.m.
Speaker – Graham Jarvis
Subject – 100 years of theatres around Newport

 Wednesday 25th October – 7 p.m.
Speaker – David Harrison
Subject – Dylan Thomas Centenary

Note new time for talk listed below

Wednesday 22nd November – 2 p.m.
Speaker – Paul Busby
Subject – T.B.A

 

 

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All Social events will be advertised in the newsletters

NEWSLETTERS(click here)

Newsletters

To view these newsletters you will need Adobe Reader installed on your computer or laptop

Adobe Reader (Click Here to Obtain)

Spring 1983 Issue No.5 Newsletter (click here)

Kindly provided by Cyril Highman – Addresses of Committee Members blanked out for Privacy Reasons

July 2017 Newsletter (click here)

April 2017 Newsletter (click here)

January 2017 Newsletter (click here)

October 2016 Newsletter (click here)

Oct 2016 Article by Rhiannon Gamble N.T Property Operations Manager of Tredegar House (click here)

July 2016 Newsletter (click here)

April 2016 Newsletter (click here)

January 2016 Newsletter(click here)

Jan 2016 – Article by Linda Wigley National Trust General Manager of Tredegar House( click here)

October 2015 Newsletter(click here)

Oct 2015 -Article by Linda Wigley National Trust General Manager of Tredegar House( click here)

July 2015 Newsletter(click here)

April 2015 Newsletter ( click here)

January 2015 News Letter(click here)

Our sincere apologies to Dr N Mills

  the report in the above Newsletter  article about the Battle of Balaclava Diner is incorrect

He in fact gave a reading of Tennyson’s Charge of the Light Brigade

January 2015 Insert(click here)

October 2014 Newsletter(click here)

Article by Adam Ellis-Jones National Trust Assistant Director of Operations( click here)

July 2014 Newsletter(click here)

Article by Joanna Cartwright National Trust Property Manager of Tredegar House( click here)

April 2014 Newsletter ( click here)

Article by Joanna Cartwright National Trust Property Manager of Tredegar House( click here)

January 2014 Newsletter(click here)

October 2013 Newsletter(click here)

July 2013 Newsletter(click here)

April 2013 Newsletter(click here)

Letter from Jo Cartwright Property Manager Tredegar House-April 2013(click here)

January 2013 Newsletter (click here)

January 2013 Newsletter Pull out Section (click here)

October 2012 Newsletter(click here)

Letter from Jo Cartwright Property Manager Tredegar House- September 2012(click here)

July 2012 Newsletter(click here)

Letter From the Mayor Of Newport(click here)

April 2012 Newsletter (click here)

January 2012 Newsletter(click here)

National Trust statement insert for  January 2012 Newsletter(click here)

September 2011 Newsletter(click here)

May 2011 Newsletter(click here)

February 2011 Newsletter(click here)

News from America

News from America from Monty Dart

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image002         It is always thrilling when we greet our American cousins at Tredegar House and we love to hear their connections with the Morgan family. Readers of the website will remember the acquisition of Godfrey’s cigar cutter that turned up from South Dakota – see that article here

http://www.friends-of-tredegar-co.uk/?s=cigar+cutter

An interesting email arrived from Janice Fix – ‘I’m trying to find out information for my aunt who has a document that is a lease of property from Lord Tredegar what she says looks like it’s on vellum.

She spoke with someone from the local library and said that these documents were a dime a dozen. She said the lease is for property at 4 Gainsborough Street, Mile End, not sure if that is correct or if it is supposed to be near Tredegar Square.

I can’t locate anything near Tredegar Square.  She would like to donate it but not sure who to contact.  She doesn’t remember where the document came from or even that she had it.  If you would be interested in the document, please let me know and she would be more than happy to forward it to you.’

Thank you. Janice Fix

What was this document doing in America? It is sad that this document was described as ‘a dime a dozen’, someone had seen fit to conserve it but why?

Carolyn Fix goes on to explain how it ended up in her possession

The document in question is a deed of sale for a property Godfrey Morgan, Lord Tredegar owned in London dated 5th August 1862.

We know that the Morgan family owned property and land all over London.

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             An example of the houses around Tredegar Square

 

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Carolyn Fix – Janice’s aunt

Carolyn is now coming up to 94 years of age and this is a photo of her in a WAC uniform as she was a WAC during WWII and is still active in meetings and luncheons for WAC Veterans. This is her story.

‘Sometime around the end of November, 1977, I went to the Estate sale of Cleveland Fisher in Manassas, Virginia.  I was interested in some books and bought a few in a box lot.  Since it has been some time, I believe the document was included in that lot from the estate sale.  We’re not sure how Mr. Fisher came to own it, but he was known to collect old things.’

INDENTURE

Lease 77 ¼ years to 1938 – 4 Gainsborough Road, Hamlet Mile End, Stepney, Tredegar Square to Widow Mrs. Sarah Broodbank

The document measures 26.5 X 22 inches on vellum (two pages).

‘I didn’t remember having the document until recently while looking for something.

My niece Janice Fix, of New Jersey, USA, looked up the names on the document and found that it was possibly related to the Morgans and Lord Tredegar and from there, she found Friends of Tredegar House and was in contact with Ms. Monty Dart.  We are happy and excited to have the document back where it belongs. We hope that the document is being enjoyed as part of the history of Lord Tredegar.’

Carolyn Fix of Vienna, VA, USA.

Looking at the area now it is filled with £1,50000 houses and there is even a public house named ‘Lord Tredegar’ though Gainsborough Road has since disappeared.

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‘Portrait of Lord Tredegar on an inn sign in Lichfield Road. Lord Tredegar, formerly Sir Charles Morgan of Tredegar, owned an area of land in the area. Between 1820 and 1832 buildings of a superior class were erected around what is now Tredegar Square. They still stand out from much of the surrounding housing. Lord Tredegar has a pub, a square and a street named after him, for there is also a Morgan Street nearby.’ From www.exploringeastlondon.co.uk

But what of Mr Cleveland Fisher – what connection if anything did he have to the Tredegar Estate?

The 1930’s USA census shows Cleveland Fisher lived with his parents in a house worth $3500 – check this site for values. https://www.measuringworth.com

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1930 Census – USA

He was born September 22nd, 1918. November, 1977 and passed away in Manassas, Virginia at the age of 59.

What was his connection if any to the Morgan family and Godfrey in particular? I’m still checking American newspapers and articles so watch this space.

Monty Dart

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NO ‘SHRINKING VIOLET’ By Monty Dart

 

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No ‘Shrinking Violet’ by Monty Dart

The Hon. Violet Wilhelmina Morgan was born on 23rd September 1860 at Ruperra Castle. She was the daughter of Hon. Frederic Courtenay Morgan and Williamson. From a young age she became a keen horsewoman, in fact she followed the male Morgans in their love Charlotte of outdoor pursuits, hunting and shooting. In the portrait by John Charlton at Tredegar House, she can be seen on horseback, sitting behind her father Frederic – with a view of Ruperra Castle in the background. (Click here for painting at Tredegar House) She produced a book of hunting sketches in 1890 a copy of which is in Newport Reference Library (see link at the end of this article). On 28th August 1894 Violet married her first cousin once removed, Basil St John Mundy, at St James Church, Piccadilly, London. The wedding was described in the Cardiff Times – ‘the bride wore a wedding gown of the richest white duchesse satin, trimmed with antique Brussels lace’ ‘The hymn ‘Near my God to thee’ conducted her, accompanied by her father, to the chancel rails. She looked handsome in a wedding gown of the richest white duchesse satin, artistically trimmed with antique Brussels lace, and full court train of the newest design. Her fine tulle veil covered a small wreath of orange blossoms intermingled with myrtle, her only ornament being a diamond and turquoise brooch, the gift of the bridesmaids and she carried a choice bridal bouquet of white blooms, the principal part being of white heather, specially grown and sent from Scotland for the occasion, tied with satin streamers en suite. There were only three bridesmaids (nieces of the bride) Miss Daisy Hoare, Miss Violet Hoare and Miss Rose Hoare daughters of Mr and Mrs C. Twysden Hoare of Bignell, Bicester* who wore gowns of white Indian muslin, with cream Valenciennes lace over green satin. They also wore hats to match, ornamented with wide lace brims and loops of green satin ribbon. The bridegrooms present to them, as a memento of the occasion was pearl and gold swallow safety-pin brooches and ‘nosegay’ of selected pale pink carnations tied with streamers.’

  • Violet, Daisy and Rose were the daughters of Blanche Frances Hoare (nee Morgan, daughter of Frederic Morgan and Charlotte Williamson)

Basil her bridegroom was a Major in the King’s Own 15th Regiment of Hussars.  In 1895 they were in Ireland with his regiment where their son, Frederick Charles was born on 8th March. He was to be their only child. In 1916 ‘Freddie’ was wounded. He was awarded the Military Cross for his gallantry and devotion to duty, yet he returned to the seat of War, and was killed on 26th October 1917 and is buried at Duhallow, Ypres.

As Katharine Morgan, Lady Tredegar lived apart from her husband Courtenay for most of their married life, Violet as Courtenay Morgan’s sister often took the role of ‘Lady Tredegar’ at Morgan family gatherings and public occasions. Violet and Basil Mundy had a home in Thornbury, Gloucestershire, where she was to live for the rest of her life.  He died on 26th August 1926 as a result of injuries sustained in the Boer War. Violet was described in ‘Fifty Years of Racing at Chepstow’ by Pat Lucas). ‘Tall, usually dressed in black…she was as capable of putting a ferret down a rabbit burrow and handling a 12 bore gun as she was as following the hunt with nerve and skill which would put any hunting man to shame.’

This photo of Violet and Courtenay was taken at an annual ball at Tredegar House.

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Violet was greatly respected in Thornbury where she and her husband Basil are buried. The last time I visited there the grave was a mass of fragrant wallflowers. Nearby is the grave of her companion Mary Mallis, ‘In loving memory of Mary for 42 years – faithful servant and beloved friend of Violet Mundy. 1870 – 1931’ When Violet died on December 22nd 1943 she left generous bequests to Thornbury

‘The Hon Mrs. Violet Wilhelmina Mundy of Thornbury, Glos. Widow of Major B. St.J. Mundy, who died on December 22 aged 83, left £52, 876. She left after certain bequests the residue as to £6,000 for a recreation ground, park or pleasure ground for Thornbury: £500 to the church council of Thornbury. For repairing of the parish church: £100 to Almondsbury Hospital: and after the payment on the duties on these three bequests, the remainder to Bristol Dog’s Home, Bristol General Hospital, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol Eye Hospital, Muller’s Orphanage, Bristol and the Waifs and Strays Society.’

 

 

image006Violet Mundy on the white horse December 21st 1907 – with Captain Walter Lindsay on the left.

 

image007      The grave of Violet’s ‘beloved servant and friend – Mary Mallis’ who is buried in the Thornbury Cemetery’- ‘Brave, Unselfish and Loving’. A wonderful citation for a beloved member of the Mundy household. Mary Mallis followed Violet from her position at Ruperra Castle.

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Ruperra Castle

 

The grave of Violet and Basil at Thornbury

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Violet’s heritage at Thornbury – the Mundy Playing Fields.

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In researching this article, I came across a description of the Mundy’s.  http://www.thornburyroots.co.uk/families/mundy-violet/. Excellently sourced you can see a digital booklet of Violet’s Hunting Sketches and a Pathe News film of the tragic race in the Epsom Derby when her horse Avenger fell. Violet was described in the hunting world as ‘Hellcat’ Mundy – she did not suffer fools gladly. She was a product of her time, – she was feisty and fearless, so different from the latter day Morgans who abandoned the Morgan pursuits in the countryside for nightclubs and fast living.

 

Beatrice Mina Louise Coombs – Wife of John Evans Chauffeur at Tredegar House

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Article provided by Martyn Evans a family relative and member of Friends of Tredegar House

 Beatrice Mina Louise Coombs was born in Buckhorn Weston North Dorset 18th August 1892, one of six children to John and Elizabeth Coombs.John Coombs was born in1861. By the age of 20 in 1881 he was an agricultural labourer,he then went on to work for the council repairing roads with his 2 sons.

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In 1911 Beatrice was working as a housemaid – one of sixteen live-in staff, for the Earl & Countess of Melville & Leven in their London home and also at Kirtlington Park in Oxfordshire.

The Earl was only 24 – having lost his father in 1906.

Sadly, he was only to live another three years.
By co-incidence Frederick Morgan’s (of Ruperra Castle) great-grand-daughter and great grand-daughter live in Kirtlington.

Kirtlington Park near Oxford is now a prestige a wedding venue http://www.kirtlingtonpark.co.uk/

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Photo courtesy of Guy Collier Photography – http://guycollierphotography.com

In 1913 Beatrice came to Tredegar House as a housemaid. Maude Williams the Housekeeper was her cousin. Maude had previously worked for the Sturt family at their London home and at Crichel (Evan Morgan’s first wife was Lois Sturt) and no doubt encouraged her cousin to apply for the job.

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Crichel – where Lois Sturt was brought up. Have a look at her home in these wonderful Country Life photographs
http://www.countrylifeimages.co.uk/Search.aspx?s=crichel%20house

Beatrice met her future husband John Evans chauffer to both Courtenay Morgan and Evan Morgan. Look at the link on this website about the Servants and Estate Workers (under Tredegar House Topics) to read more of John (fondly known as Jack by the family) and his capture by Turk Rebels in 1916.

Link to article mentioned above.

http://www.friends-of-tredegar-house.co.uk/home/john-evans-chauffeur-to-lord-tredegar/

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Beatrice and John married in 1922 in Buckhorn Weston North Dorset in 1923 they had one son. They lived at Tredegar Park Cottages opposite Cleppa Park, an estate house that John’s parents & grandparents had lived in.
When John passed away in November 1965 Beatrice stayed in the house until the early 1970s, she then moved back to Buckhorn Weston to live with her sister. Beatrice passed away on 30th November 1976

Beatrice Mina Louise Coombs
What must have it been like for these young women to work in such grand houses when most of them had been brought up in humble surroundings?

 

A history of the family of Morgan, from the year 1089 to present times- Written in 1902 by Appleton Morgan

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With thanks to Monty Dart For this link

Written in 1902 (limited to 500 copies) by Appleton Morgan (1845-1928)

A history of the family of Morgan, from the year 1089 to present times

It was acquired by New York Public Library

Written by an American Morgan claiming to be a 27th generation of Cadifor Fawr

The reader will discover many USA Morgans hitherto unknown.

An Interactive and searchable book and can be downloaded or read on-line.

Here is a direct link.

https://archive.org/stream/historyoffamilyo00morg#page/n9/mode/2up.

appleton morgan

Blue Plaques In Newport

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Thanks to Cyril Highman of The Newport Civic Society for the following

CITY OF NEWPORT BLUE PLAQUES
Erected at sites of historical, natural or architectural interest in Newport

DOS NAIL WORKS AND COTTAGES. Built 1835 for J.J. Cordes, later of Brynglas House. It was the first large local factory and ran an evening class for its child employees.
Location: Factory Road (aptly named), a turning off Mill Street. The plaque is affixed to the still surviving office building, Cordes House.

THE WESTGATE HOTEL. Rebuilt 1885, still on the site of the town’s medieval western gateway. Here in 1839 troops repulsed the Chartists. Doric columns which flanked the portico are retained.
Location. A prominent city centre site at the junction of Commercial Street and Stow Hill. No longer in use as a hotel. Listed Grade 2.

THE CATTLE MARKET. Built in 1844 by the Tredegar Wharf Co. which earlier developed Pillgwenlly. For centuries before, produce and livestock had been traded in High Street.
Location: Off Commercial Road in an area bounded by Ruperra Street, West Market Street, East Market Street and South Market Street. South range, Listed Grade 2. The market site was cleared for re-development as a supermarket in 2010..

PARK SQUARE TRANSFORMER. From 1895 rubber-covered cable carried 2000 volt A.C. current from Newport’s first power station in Llanarth Street to transformers which reduced it to 200 volt for supplying the wealthier householders.
Location: Park Square (lying between Stow Hill and Commercial Street) Listed Grade 2. A similar example is located in Graham Street, Baneswell

THE OLD TOWN DOCK. Crowded river moorings proved inadequate for Newport’s expanding coal and iron trade. The first enclosed dock covering over four acres was built in 1842. Extended in 1858 it was filled in in 1931.
Location: From the southern end of Lower Dock Street it extended to what is now the Southern Distributor Road. The plaque is affixed to a listed building known as the Malt House

THE CUSTOM HOUSE. As ship movements concentrated ever further down river, ship brokers, chandlers, consulates and bonded warehouses became established in Lower Dock Street. H.M. Customs moved here from Skinner Street in 1858.
Location: Lower Dock Street. Listed Grade 2.

CAMBRIAN HOUSE. Built in 1854 for Thomas Spittle, who developed the Cambrian Foundry on a site later known as Spittle’s Point. He also owned works on the east bank where three iron ships were launched.
Location: St John’s Road, off Chepstow Road. Listed Grade 2.

PREACHING CROSS. This marks the original position of the town’s preaching cross. The base of the cross is now situated in the graveyard of Newport Cathedral.
Location: Stow Hill at its junction with Havelock Street. Note the reproduction town cross erected in High Street

BANESWELL. Before piped water in 1848, Newport’s 19,000 inhabitants drew from springs and wells as in medieval times. Districts were named after wells, though cholera and typhoid epidemics indicate they were not a pure supply.
Location: Pump Street, Baneswell Note the district named Eveswell on the Chepstow Road side of Newport

VICTORIA PLACE. Rennie-Hill, builders of the Town Dock erected this Regency style terrace on land given by William Townsend to provide access to Stow Hill from the south-east.
Location: Stow Hill, some 200 yards below the Cathedral. Listed Grade 2 (nos. 1 – 13 consequtively)

CRINDAU HOUSE. 1580 on moulded porch entry. Initials H.M. with date probably refer to Humphrey Morgan of Llantarnam who married Katherine Herbert, heiress of Crindau.
Location: Chelston Place, off Redland Street, Malpas Road

THE RAGGED SCHOOL. A national charitable movement provided Ragged Schools for children unable to pay to attend the National and British Schools run by the churches.
Location: Junction of Lower Dock Street and Mellon Street

THE FRIARS. Home of Octavius Morgan (1803-88). Antiquarian and horologist brother of 1st Lord Tredegar, M.P. for Monmouthshire 1841-74. Initiator of archaeological fieldwork at Caerwent and Caerleon and the Legionary Museum.
Location: Friars Road near its junction with Belle Vue Lane. Now occupied by the local health authority. Listed Grade 2.

TREDEGAR ESTATES OFFICE (1905). Formerly extending into Glamorganshire and Breconshire, the Tredegar Estate was, until its dispersal in 1956, the County’s biggest landowner. Here its records were kept and its rents paid.
Location: Pentonville, adjoining Mill Street. Surviving records are now lodged in the National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth. Listed Grade 2.

BOUNDARY STONE. This marked the limit of the town from its medieval origins until 1835, when its first extension took in the workhouse (now part of St Woolos Hospital) and Pillgwenlly,
Location: Newport Cathedral raised walkway alongside Stow Hill. Visible only from the roadway.

JAMES FLEWITT MULLOCK 1818-1892. To commemorate the life of a Victorian Newportonian – artist – art teacher – bibliophile – educational reformer – bon vivant – horticulturalist and clerk to Newport and St Woolos Burial Board, the first municipal body of its kind in Britain.
Location: St Woolos Cemetery, Bassaleg Road, Affixed to former Keeper’s Lodge, inside entrance gates.

EMLYN ENGINEERING WORKS, The Newport Centre is built on the site of the former Emlyn Engineering Works opened in 1857 and owned by Charles D. Phillips. The works were a major iron foundry supporting colliery, shipping and railway interests.
Location: The Newport Centre, Kingsway. Note adjoining Emlyn Street.

GEORGE PHILIP REYNOLDS 1864-1907. Founder in 1887 of the Boys’ Brigade in Wales. The movement began at this church as the 1st Newport Company, which still meets in the City. The church was listed Grade II in 1997 for its polychromate italianate style.
Location: Havelock Street Presbyterian Church, Havelock Street, off Stow Hill.

NEWPORT PROVISIONS MARKET. Built in 1854, an early example of a large span cast iron frame building featuring its glass-filled barrel roof. The Dock Street offices and tower were constructed later in 1887.
Location: Upper Dock Street extending through into High Street. The plaque is mounted at the Dock Street end. Listed Grade 2.

JAMES MATTHEWS. Chief Librarian of Newport from 1875 to 1917. Author of ‘Historic Newport’, one of the few histories of the town, published in 1910 and reproduced by Newport Library in 1996. Previously closely involved in setting up the first children’s library in England.
Location: Newport Central Library and Museum, John Frost Square.

NEWPORT TOWN HALL. Stood with its imposing clock tower on this site from 1842 to 1960. The office transferred to the new Civic Centre in 1950. Field Marshal Sir Bernard Law Montgomery addressed the citizens from its gallery when granted the Freedom of Newport in 1945.
Location: British Home Stores, on the completely reconstructed site in Commercial Street

THE OLD POST OFFICE. Site of Newport’s first Head Post Office built in 1844 and re-built in 1907, the Edwardian facade being preserved in the total reconstruction of the island site in 2001. Once housed the town’s first telephone exchange, known as ‘The Savoy’. Listed Grade 2 in 1985.
Location: High Street. Note its siting close to the railway station where mail was delivered and despatched and to which it was connected by its own subway

ODEON CINEMA Designed in the Art Deco style by Arthur Price. One of a chain of cinemas created by Oscar Deutsch in the Thirties. A rare surviving example in Wales of the Odeon style. Listed Grade 2 in 1999.
Location: Clarence Place.

NEWPORT HARBOUR COMMISSIONERS LANDING STAGE. Paddle steamers of P & A Campbell’s famous White Funnel Fleet regularly sailed from near this point. Opened in the 1880s, extended in the mid-1890s and closed in the 1950s.
Location: South-eastern end of Newport Town Bridge. Newport Town Bridge is Listed Grade 2.

TREDEGAR HOUSE. For 500 years until 1951 the ancestral home of the Morgans of Tredegar. Listed Grade 1 as one of the finest restoration houses in Britain. Now in the care of Newport City Council.
Location: Cardiff Road near Junction 28 of the M4 Motorway. The House is surrounded by some 90 acres of beautiful Parkland. The plaque is mounted on its south-east face overlooking the cobbled service courtyard. The estate was leased to The National Trust in 2012.

JOHN FROST, 1784-1877. Chartist, Mayor of Newport 1836-7. Born Thomas Street.
Location: Thomas Street no longer exists as a public thoroughfare and has been absorbed behind a glazed facade linking the Old Post Office with the re-built Corn Exchange offices.

WILLIAM HENRY DAVIES, 1871-1940. Newport born poet and author.
‘What is this life, if, full of care, we have no time to stand and stare ……..’
Two years after his birth in 6 Portland Street, William was taken into care by his paternal grandparents, proprietors of the nearby Church House Inn. The plaque was unveiled by John Masefield, Poet Laureate, in 1938. William died two years later on 26th September, 1940.

MAI JONES, 1899-1960. ‘We’ll keep a welcome in the hillsides’
Welsh songwriter, producer of radio show ‘Welsh Rarebit’ and entertainer
Resident at 19 St Mark’s Crescent, Newport
Plaque unveiled on 7th May 2010, the 50th anniversary of her death

WETLANDS RESERVE, Uskmouth East
Plaque unveiled 2nd March 2000 by the Chairman of the Cardiff Bay Development Corporation.
A major nature reserve acquired, designed and implemented in mitigation for the removal of the Taff Ely SSSI between 1996 and 1999. It was a joint project of the Land Authority for Wales and the Cardiff Bay Development Corporation

NEWPORT SHIP. In 2002 the remains of a large merchant-ship, dating from the fifteenth century, were discovered on this site.
LLONG CASNEWYDD, Yn 2002, ar y safle hwn, cafwyd hyd i olion llongfasnach fawr yn dyddio’n o’l i’r bymthegfed ganrif
Newport Riverfront Theatre. Unveiled jointly by Newport Civic Society and The Friends of the Newport Ship in October 2011

BELLE VUE PARK. Opened in 1894 by Lord Tredegar. Designed by Thomas Mawson, landscape architect, Windermere. Restored 2006 with aid of Heritage Lottery Fund.
PARC BELLE VUE, agorwyd yn 1894 gan Arglwydd Tredegar. Cynllunlwyd gan Thomas Mawson, Pensarn Tirlun, Windermere. Adferwyd yn 2006 gan Gyngor Dinas Casnewydd, gyda chymorth Cronfa Dredtadaeth y Loteri.

LADY RHONDDA – Margaret Haig Mackworth Suffragette and Editor
Set fire to letter-box in cemetery wall in Risca Road in June 1913 Plaque erected at house adjoining in June 2015

Link to Lady Rhondda

Revised June 2015 NE WPORT CIVIC SOCIETY
www.newportcivic.org
Registered Charity No. 700399 City of Newport Blue Plaques Revised2.doc
No 28 070510
City of Newport Blue Plaques Revised2.doc

 

Copyright © 2012 Friends of Tredegar House