News from America

News from America from Monty Dart

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image002         It is always thrilling when we greet our American cousins at Tredegar House and we love to hear their connections with the Morgan family. Readers of the website will remember the acquisition of Godfrey’s cigar cutter that turned up from South Dakota – see that article here

http://www.friends-of-tredegar-co.uk/?s=cigar+cutter

An interesting email arrived from Janice Fix – ‘I’m trying to find out information for my aunt who has a document that is a lease of property from Lord Tredegar what she says looks like it’s on vellum.

She spoke with someone from the local library and said that these documents were a dime a dozen. She said the lease is for property at 4 Gainsborough Street, Mile End, not sure if that is correct or if it is supposed to be near Tredegar Square.

I can’t locate anything near Tredegar Square.  She would like to donate it but not sure who to contact.  She doesn’t remember where the document came from or even that she had it.  If you would be interested in the document, please let me know and she would be more than happy to forward it to you.’

Thank you. Janice Fix

What was this document doing in America? It is sad that this document was described as ‘a dime a dozen’, someone had seen fit to conserve it but why?

Carolyn Fix goes on to explain how it ended up in her possession

The document in question is a deed of sale for a property Godfrey Morgan, Lord Tredegar owned in London dated 5th August 1862.

We know that the Morgan family owned property and land all over London.

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             An example of the houses around Tredegar Square

 

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Carolyn Fix – Janice’s aunt

Carolyn is now coming up to 94 years of age and this is a photo of her in a WAC uniform as she was a WAC during WWII and is still active in meetings and luncheons for WAC Veterans. This is her story.

‘Sometime around the end of November, 1977, I went to the Estate sale of Cleveland Fisher in Manassas, Virginia.  I was interested in some books and bought a few in a box lot.  Since it has been some time, I believe the document was included in that lot from the estate sale.  We’re not sure how Mr. Fisher came to own it, but he was known to collect old things.’

INDENTURE

Lease 77 ¼ years to 1938 – 4 Gainsborough Road, Hamlet Mile End, Stepney, Tredegar Square to Widow Mrs. Sarah Broodbank

The document measures 26.5 X 22 inches on vellum (two pages).

‘I didn’t remember having the document until recently while looking for something.

My niece Janice Fix, of New Jersey, USA, looked up the names on the document and found that it was possibly related to the Morgans and Lord Tredegar and from there, she found Friends of Tredegar House and was in contact with Ms. Monty Dart.  We are happy and excited to have the document back where it belongs. We hope that the document is being enjoyed as part of the history of Lord Tredegar.’

Carolyn Fix of Vienna, VA, USA.

Looking at the area now it is filled with £1,50000 houses and there is even a public house named ‘Lord Tredegar’ though Gainsborough Road has since disappeared.

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‘Portrait of Lord Tredegar on an inn sign in Lichfield Road. Lord Tredegar, formerly Sir Charles Morgan of Tredegar, owned an area of land in the area. Between 1820 and 1832 buildings of a superior class were erected around what is now Tredegar Square. They still stand out from much of the surrounding housing. Lord Tredegar has a pub, a square and a street named after him, for there is also a Morgan Street nearby.’ From www.exploringeastlondon.co.uk

But what of Mr Cleveland Fisher – what connection if anything did he have to the Tredegar Estate?

The 1930’s USA census shows Cleveland Fisher lived with his parents in a house worth $3500 – check this site for values. https://www.measuringworth.com

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1930 Census – USA

He was born September 22nd, 1918. November, 1977 and passed away in Manassas, Virginia at the age of 59.

What was his connection if any to the Morgan family and Godfrey in particular? I’m still checking American newspapers and articles so watch this space.

Monty Dart

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NO ‘SHRINKING VIOLET’ By Monty Dart

 

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No ‘Shrinking Violet’ by Monty Dart

The Hon. Violet Wilhelmina Morgan was born on 23rd September 1860 at Ruperra Castle. She was the daughter of Hon. Frederic Courtenay Morgan and Williamson. From a young age she became a keen horsewoman, in fact she followed the male Morgans in their love Charlotte of outdoor pursuits, hunting and shooting. In the portrait by John Charlton at Tredegar House, she can be seen on horseback, sitting behind her father Frederic – with a view of Ruperra Castle in the background. (Click here for painting at Tredegar House) She produced a book of hunting sketches in 1890 a copy of which is in Newport Reference Library (see link at the end of this article). On 28th August 1894 Violet married her first cousin once removed, Basil St John Mundy, at St James Church, Piccadilly, London. The wedding was described in the Cardiff Times – ‘the bride wore a wedding gown of the richest white duchesse satin, trimmed with antique Brussels lace’ ‘The hymn ‘Near my God to thee’ conducted her, accompanied by her father, to the chancel rails. She looked handsome in a wedding gown of the richest white duchesse satin, artistically trimmed with antique Brussels lace, and full court train of the newest design. Her fine tulle veil covered a small wreath of orange blossoms intermingled with myrtle, her only ornament being a diamond and turquoise brooch, the gift of the bridesmaids and she carried a choice bridal bouquet of white blooms, the principal part being of white heather, specially grown and sent from Scotland for the occasion, tied with satin streamers en suite. There were only three bridesmaids (nieces of the bride) Miss Daisy Hoare, Miss Violet Hoare and Miss Rose Hoare daughters of Mr and Mrs C. Twysden Hoare of Bignell, Bicester* who wore gowns of white Indian muslin, with cream Valenciennes lace over green satin. They also wore hats to match, ornamented with wide lace brims and loops of green satin ribbon. The bridegrooms present to them, as a memento of the occasion was pearl and gold swallow safety-pin brooches and ‘nosegay’ of selected pale pink carnations tied with streamers.’

  • Violet, Daisy and Rose were the daughters of Blanche Frances Hoare (nee Morgan, daughter of Frederic Morgan and Charlotte Williamson)

Basil her bridegroom was a Major in the King’s Own 15th Regiment of Hussars.  In 1895 they were in Ireland with his regiment where their son, Frederick Charles was born on 8th March. He was to be their only child. In 1916 ‘Freddie’ was wounded. He was awarded the Military Cross for his gallantry and devotion to duty, yet he returned to the seat of War, and was killed on 26th October 1917 and is buried at Duhallow, Ypres.

As Katharine Morgan, Lady Tredegar lived apart from her husband Courtenay for most of their married life, Violet as Courtenay Morgan’s sister often took the role of ‘Lady Tredegar’ at Morgan family gatherings and public occasions. Violet and Basil Mundy had a home in Thornbury, Gloucestershire, where she was to live for the rest of her life.  He died on 26th August 1926 as a result of injuries sustained in the Boer War. Violet was described in ‘Fifty Years of Racing at Chepstow’ by Pat Lucas). ‘Tall, usually dressed in black…she was as capable of putting a ferret down a rabbit burrow and handling a 12 bore gun as she was as following the hunt with nerve and skill which would put any hunting man to shame.’

This photo of Violet and Courtenay was taken at an annual ball at Tredegar House.

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Violet was greatly respected in Thornbury where she and her husband Basil are buried. The last time I visited there the grave was a mass of fragrant wallflowers. Nearby is the grave of her companion Mary Mallis, ‘In loving memory of Mary for 42 years – faithful servant and beloved friend of Violet Mundy. 1870 – 1931’ When Violet died on December 22nd 1943 she left generous bequests to Thornbury

‘The Hon Mrs. Violet Wilhelmina Mundy of Thornbury, Glos. Widow of Major B. St.J. Mundy, who died on December 22 aged 83, left £52, 876. She left after certain bequests the residue as to £6,000 for a recreation ground, park or pleasure ground for Thornbury: £500 to the church council of Thornbury. For repairing of the parish church: £100 to Almondsbury Hospital: and after the payment on the duties on these three bequests, the remainder to Bristol Dog’s Home, Bristol General Hospital, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol Eye Hospital, Muller’s Orphanage, Bristol and the Waifs and Strays Society.’

 

 

image006Violet Mundy on the white horse December 21st 1907 – with Captain Walter Lindsay on the left.

 

image007      The grave of Violet’s ‘beloved servant and friend – Mary Mallis’ who is buried in the Thornbury Cemetery’- ‘Brave, Unselfish and Loving’. A wonderful citation for a beloved member of the Mundy household. Mary Mallis followed Violet from her position at Ruperra Castle.

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Ruperra Castle

 

The grave of Violet and Basil at Thornbury

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Violet’s heritage at Thornbury – the Mundy Playing Fields.

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In researching this article, I came across a description of the Mundy’s.  http://www.thornburyroots.co.uk/families/mundy-violet/. Excellently sourced you can see a digital booklet of Violet’s Hunting Sketches and a Pathe News film of the tragic race in the Epsom Derby when her horse Avenger fell. Violet was described in the hunting world as ‘Hellcat’ Mundy – she did not suffer fools gladly. She was a product of her time, – she was feisty and fearless, so different from the latter day Morgans who abandoned the Morgan pursuits in the countryside for nightclubs and fast living.

 

NEW BOOK BY WILL CROSS – LOIS INA STURT

LOIS COVER worked on

Lois Sturt, Wild Child : A Glance at Hon. Lois Ina Sturt, Viscountess Tredegar

New Book By William Cross : Now Available £8.00 Post Free UK

From the age of the flapper, with vivid yarns of those Bright Young Things comes the poignant tale of British high society wild child, the Honourable Lois Ina Sturt, a dazzling, single minded,one-off personality who was dead by the age of 37. Sibling of the enigmatic, hedonistic peer Lord ‘Naps’ Alington, the family pile was the magical Crichel Estate in Dorset. The blond, tubercular Naps was matched only in devil may care attitude by his younger sister Lois, a delectable, quixotic creature,an accomplished actress and dancer, a clever painter who studied at the Slade School of Art and had her own art studio in Chelsea. She also became a successful race horse owner and breeder of Great Danes. But Lois’ story is largely untold. She was deemed “fast” and “high-spirited”: Lois wanted to knock the stuffing out of convention and achieved this by engaging in several long love affairs, generally with older, married men. She was for four years the lover of the much older Reggie Herbert, 15th Earl of Pembroke, and an intimate around the string of unapproved-of good-time girls chasing Prince George, the ill-fated Duke of Kent. In 1928 Lois entered into an arranged, madcap marriage de convenance with the homosexual Hon. Evan Frederic Morgan, heir to the Viscount Tredegar and died suddenly in Budapest in 1937, a victim of long years of alcohol abuse and insane slimming treatments. Author of previous titles on several forgotten Society figures of the 1920s and 1930s, William Cross presents all the humorous anecdotes, coupled with fascinating, yet often sad facts on the boisterous life and times of Evan Morgan’s first wife Lois, Viscountess Tredegar. Incredibly, Lois may boast a blood connection to the current heir to the British throne. ISBN 10 1-905914-31-8 and ISBN 13 978-1-905914-31-9

Published by William P. Cross through Book Midden Publishing 58 Sutton Road, Newport, Gwent NP19 7JF, United Kingdom   £8.00 Post Free UK until 31 December 2014

OVERSEAS ORDERS PLEASE USE AMAZON Cheques/ POs payable to “ William Cross”

 williecross@virginmedia.com

 A new book from William Cross, FSA Scot on Lois Sturt, actress, painter and first wife of Evan Morgan, later Viscount Tredegar. Lois died in Budapest in 1937, aged 37. She was one of the brightest of the Bright Young Things, but doomed because of her quest for fun and high living. Lois was Viscountess Tredegar from 1934 -1937.

A link to article from The Daily Telegraph

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/luxury/art/62799/ambrose-mcevoy-portrait-of-lois-sturt-exceeds-estimate-at-dreweatts-saleroom.html

FOLLOW BLOG ON LOIS STURT

 http://lois-sturt.blogspot.co.uk/

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Lois by Tony Wysard (1907-1984) Caricaturist & Fashion Editor

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LOIS COVER FOR FOTH

 

 

 

 

Opening of the Alexandra Dock Newport

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In this photo Prince Arthur is in the front, Courtenay is behind him and Evan is behind Mather-Jackson (Lord Lieutenant) who is wearing a top hat. It was the day after Evan’s 21st birthday.

I have recently been involved in an exhibition to commemorate the 100th  anniversary of the opening of Alexandra Dock by the Duke of Connaught. It was one of Courtenay’s proudest moments – as Liberty sailed into the Dock (most of the Morgan family were aboard) and Prince Arthur cut the ribbon.  I still don’t understand how you put a ribbon across a dock. Let alone cut it when you are on a boat!  I hope you enjoy this animation by the children of Pillgwenlly Primary School.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Frl88o75HnQ

The film refers to the Newport Dock Disaster – this is an 8 min film about the event

the original is about 45 mins    watch  it here      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UEVB_nlobgk

 

 Monty Dart

 

 

 

Latest New Book From William Cross : Now Available – The Abergavenny Witch Hunt

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Latest New Book From William Cross : Now Available

Scandal from South Wales in the Second World War

The Abergavenny Witch Hunt

An account of the prosecution of over twenty homosexuals in a small Welsh town in 1942

The book will feature in the Abergavenny Chronicle

All profits from the book go to an Abergavenny Charity in memory of Lewis Matthews of Abergavenny, a promising nine-teen-year old who committed suicide by throwing himself under a train in 1942.

The details of the book are below

The book can also be purchased from the Abergavenny Book Shop ( Brian Hughes ) Cross Street,
Abergavenny,

Directly from the Author £12.00 including UK postage and packing

On Amazon ( slightly higher priced ).

Review Copies Available for press, bloggers ( who review books) etc etc

ISBN 10 1-905914-22-9 and ISBN 13 978-1-905914-22-7

Published by William P. Cross through Book Midden Publishing

58 Sutton Road, Newport, Gwent, NP19 7JF

United Kingdom

Normal Listed Price £12.00 UK ONLY + Postage and Packing

Cheques/ PO made payable to William Cross

58, Sutton Road, Newport, Gwent, NP19 7JF

Abergavennywitchhuntamazon

In 1942, the Welsh town of Abergavenny was scandalised by disclosures after the arrest of over twenty youths and men on charges relating to homosexual activity and corrupting boys. George Rowe, the 40-year-old manager of Abergavennys Coliseum cinema was at the centre of a Police enquiry after one of the page-boys complained about being molested. The boys complaint turned into a witch-hunt of  homosexuals across Britain revealing a oddball mix of abused and abusers; a farmer, a clerk, two chefs, a fireman, several serving soldiers, a hairdresser, an actor and others were arrested and brought back to Abergavenny, where almost all the offences were committed.

 

Before the case reached a Judge at Monmouthshire Assizes, three men attempted suicide, one young man succeeded in taking his own life. In the years that followed rumours persisted that several people had got away scot-free, including one notable public figure. Others went on the run to escape capture and disgrace, since all homosexuality was illegal in Britain until the changes started by the Sexual Offences Act, 1967.

 

William Cross the biographer of Almina, Countess of Carnarvon, and of salacious tales about the Morgans of Tredegar House, Newport, South Wales, is no stranger to controversial histories. Cross examines the facts in the Abergavenny case and sets out details from contemporary newspapers including closed files at National Archives, now released under the Freedom of Information Act. Here for the first time is the unvarnished truth, the background, the preliminary proceedings, the trial and the aftermath of a grisly, but sad tale from Abergavennys’ past that some would prefer to see buried forever.

 

 

Reunited

Martyn,Elizabeth,Paul

Martyn,Elizabeth,Paul
At the Edeny Gates

Hi Annie and Monty
Annie a big thank you for the photo’s you sent me.

Article for the website.

August 15th 2013 is a day I will always remember. I received an email from Annie Parker,
ref an email she had received through the website from Elizabeth Rassmussen who
lives with her husband Paul in the United States.

Elizabeth’s sister & brother had visited Tredegar House & had seen the photo of John Evans the chauffeur (my grandfather) on the wall.

Her sister mentioned to Elizabeth about this & Elizabeth sent the email to the website.

After a couple of days Annie passed on Elizabeth’s email address to me. I was then able to send an email with the family history which goes back three generations of working at Tredegar House.

Elizabeth & I have been in contact ever since

Elizabeth’s connection to the Evans family is through John Evans’ older sister; Lucy who married William Henry Lyons in Newport. They had three children – Elizabeth’s father Hayden Desire Lyons plus two Daughters. Hayden then married & moved to Birmingham. He was an oboe player in the Birmingham Symphony Orchestra…

I happened to mention to Elizabeth about a talk at Tredegar House about the servants in the 1900,s by Monty Dart which was on June 11th.  I was overjoyed when Elizabeth & Paul said they would be coming over to visit family & friends & would be visiting Newport for two days and could
to come to the talk & also to meet up for the first time. I travelled up from Christchurch in Dorset &
met up with them at her brothers in Bristol. They then travelled with me to Newport.
In the evening we went to a wonderful talk by Monty who used some of my photos.
Elizabeth’s brother & sister from Bristol also came over, also my brother from Newport.

The next day I took Elizabeth & Paul to see the house that the Evans family had lived in for over 120 years.

Elizabeth was taking a photo of the house when the owner walked up to us.we explained about house and the connection to us.
We then were invited inside what is now one large house. It used to be four cottages.
To sit in what would have been Nan & Pops lounge for the first time in 40 years for me &
Elizabeth it was so wonderful.
In the afternoon we were invited by Monty & Annie to go around Tredegar House & the
gardens, we were overjoyed. We then went back to my brother & sister in laws for the evening. What a wonderful 2 days.

Martyn Evans

Elizabeth and Paul

Elizabeth and Paul
At the Dining table
In the Brown Room

Evan Morgan & Aleister Crowley by Will Cross and Monty Dart

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Click photo for a larger view

 

Evan Morgan and Aleister Crowley

 

 

“Saw Tredegar’s Magick room far greater than I thought and he did expect me to talk to Frieda bout it!

My one idea was to get out before any harm was done!”

 

 

 

 

Aleister Crowley makes this startling comment on visiting Evan Morgan, Viscount Tredegar, a rich aristocrat, a homosexual and a Roman Catholic convert; he was also a Papal Chamberlain at the Vatican to two Popes. What of the rumours that the two joined in black mass rituals in country churchyards? Monty Dart and Will Cross are co-authors of several books on the Morgans of Tredegar House, South Wales.  The Viscounts early cult and black mass-influences, how he met Crowley, and the bizarre events that prompted him to invite Crowley to Tredegar House in the middle of the Second World War.

 

 

 

 

Mary Courtney MBE 101st Birthday

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UNFORTUNATELY MARY PASSED AWAY ON 13TH NOVEMBER 2014.

Link to South Wales Argus Tribute to Mary(click here)

PLEASE TAKE TIME TO RE-READ THE ARTICLE BELOW.

1st July 2013

Mary Courtney MBE of Aneurin Bevan Court, woke this morning to scores of ‘happy birthday’ cards. It isn’t every day that you are 101 years old. When she joined her fellow residents in the lounge for morning coffee, little did she know that not only would she receive a present, but that she would be making a presentation herself, to Newport’s Mayor, Councillor Cliff Suller, who was accompanied by his wife Christine.

Last year an email was received by Monty Dart archivist for the Friends of Newport Transporter Bridge – coincidently, she is also archivist for the Friends of Tredegar House, the email read:

 I am the current Historian for the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology’s (SDSMT) American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) chapter.  Our chapter recently acquired what appears to be a cigar cutter from the Newport Transporter Bridge.  An alumni of SDSMT bought this cigar cutter at an antiques store and had it on his mantle for several years.  In 2007 he donated it to SDSMT.  He recently sent us a letter and was wondering if we still had it.  We found it.  The alumni would like us to get it to someone who will appreciate it, hopefully its rightful owner. SDSMT ASCE  Historian.

Brian Ruppelt

The cutter ties two famous Newport icons together –  Tredegar House and the Transporter Bridge, or three icons if you include Mary!

The cigar cutter was given to Viscount Godfrey Morgan by the contractors Alfred Thorne Ltd of Westminster on the occasion of the opening of the Transporter Bridge, Godfrey Morgan was of course Viscount Tredegar of Tredegar House. The handle that opens the cutter is a replica of the handle Viscount Tredegar would have used on the Transporter Bridge, to send it on its first journey across the Usk on 12th September 1906.

Mary worked as volunteer for the Friends at Tredegar House until the age of 98. She was a founder member (now honorary member of the Friends of Tredegar House) for over 30 years and on the occasion of her 101th birthday was pleased to present the cigar cutter – on behalf of the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology – to the Mayor, who accepted it gratefully on behalf of the City of Newport. He then led the assembled company in a rousing chorus of happy birthday. Mary acknowledged the singing saying that ‘she was very pleased to be able to present the Mayor with such a unique gift’.

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Mary presenting the Cigar Cutter to the Mayor

 

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Newport’s Mayor, Councillor Cliff Suller, with the Cigar Cutter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I spoke to Newport Museum Curator Oliver Blackmore and he said they would be pleased to have it but again, couldn’t promise to display it but it would be available for people to see on request. So that was better than nothing!  I took it to the Museum on Monday and Oliver was so thrilled to receive this unique object that he has moved things around in one of the cases and it has already gone on display! Those who can’t visit Newport Museum can see it on this short animation made by Tom my husband on the link below

Monty Dart (Archivist FOTH)

Link to the Opening of the Transporter Bridge(click here)

Aspects of Evan: The Last Viscount Tredegar

Aspects of Evan: The Last Viscount Tredegar

A New Book >From Monty Dart and William Cross

With a full transcript of Evan’s Court Martial for offences against the Official Secrets Acts

 

About The Book

 

Morgan, poet, artist, and escapist, the last Viscount Tredegar shocked his way through 

Eton, Oxford, Rome, North Africa, Bali, Canada and America.

The Bright Young Things of London’s Café Royal Society toasted him in aphorisms.

Ogling dowagers indulged him

Whilst his straight-laced  ‘hunting, shooting and fishing’ family was shaken by his escapades.

In the Great War he dodged rat-infested trenches on account of a weak chest.

Claiming he was renouncing pleasure and his birth right,

He turned to mysticism and Roman Catholicism, studying at Beda College, Rome,

Whilst acting as a Papal Chamberlain at the Vatican.

In WW2 he was working at Wing House, in the Special Section Carrier Pigeon Service.

An incautious comment in front of two visitors from the Girl Guide movement

They were at Wing House as part of a  publicity campaign for the Guides lead to his downfall.

The irony is, that Evan, who claimed a special affinity to birds,

Should be brought down to earth by a carrier pigeon!

This book will amuse and inform ‘Evanites’

With nearly 500 footnotes for scholars who wish to follow up his erratic but fascinating life.

An Extract from ‘Aspects of Evan’ : An Eccentric and a Fantasist

 

Evan Morgan was one of the Bright Young People. In the years between the two world wars of the last century he rejoiced in being a part of that irreverent faction of well-off, immoral pleasure seekers who sought unlimited thrills, with little care for the consequences of their own actions.  Stephen Fry’s film Bright Young Things  captures the high spirits and high jinxes of the toffs, like Evan, with nothing better to do with their lives than to indulge themselves and each other. Evan is seen by one historian as just an “onlooker”  ,  but he  cherished being  dubbed by another scribe  “ a leader and inspiration of the Bright Young People.”  He was always on “bowing terms”  with all the “fatuous, smirking male-flowers”  of that “gin-soaked, jazz-syncopated, frivolous time.” Evan surely remains one of the fabulous aristocratic eccentrics of that bygone age of the hedonistic 1920s and 1930s, when he was best known as the Hon. Evan Morgan or Evan Tredegar.  His own creation, he was a seemingly unstoppable fantasist whose antics are captured in anecdotes, references and footnotes in a galaxy of memoirs and diaries of his often more acclaimed and better achieved contemporaries.

 

http://evan-morgan-last-viscount-tredegar.yolasite.com/

Aspects of Evan published on 10 December 2012

Book Midden Publishing – ISBN 10  1-90591415-6/ISBN 13  978-1-905914-15-9

For further information contact William Cross, by e-mail

williecross@virginmedia.com

For anyone who desires a novel-size glimpse of  the incomparable Evan, he is caricatured in several books, for instance in comical terms as Ivor Lombard in Aldous Huxley’s Crome Yellow and more extraordinarily and farcically as the Hon. Eddy Monteith in Ronald Firbank’s satire The Flower Beneath the Foot.

This link will guide you to the digital book, which you can read on line or download.

http://archive.org/details/flowerbeneathfoo00firbuoft

A Beautiful Nuisance The Hon. Gwyneth Ericka Morgan

A Beautiful Nuisance

The Life and Death of Hon. Gwyneth Ericka Morgan 

By Monty Dart and William Cross

Tribute to Hon Gwyneth Ericka Morgan only daughter of

Courtenay Charles Evan Morgan 1867-1934  and Katharine Agnes Blanche Carnegie 1867-1949

 

Strong characters have imperfections: they can never compromise. Gwyneth Morgan could never compromise. The shadow of chaos threatened her from birth.

Beautiful, wealthy, witty, but unbalanced, her family was popular only because they were rich and had close links to the British Royal Family.

Gwyneth was the daughter of a Welsh coal baron; her mother was from an old aristocratic Scottish family. Launched as a stunning debutante Gwyneth enjoyed but more endured the rituals of the London and Highland Society in the years before and after the First World War.

She had an unconventional streak, earning a reputation as a bohemian.

Struck down by ill-health from the excesses of high living and travel, she was caught up with dangerous people of whom her family disapproved. With increasing concern Gwyneth was forced to spend her last years as a virtual prisoner moving between locations. Under medical supervision from a Society doctor, the harsh regime imposed became unbearable. She disappeared into a London fog in 1924; her badly decomposed body was pulled from the River Thames 5 months later. Where did she go? What happened? How did she die? This book explains why Gwyneth (once dubbed “a beautiful nuisance”) was airbrushed from history.

The life and death of Gwyneth Ericka Morgan” is full of surprises – the tale of a rich girl who may have paid the ultimate price to maintain her family’s coveted place in High Society.

ISBN 10 1-905914-10-5

ISBN 13 978-1-905914-10-4

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE E-MAIL WILLIAM CROSS – NOW ON SALE

williecross@virginmedia.com

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright © 2012 Friends of Tredegar House