Beatrice Mina Louise Coombs – Wife of John Evans Chauffeur at Tredegar House

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Article provided by Martyn Evans a family relative and member of Friends of Tredegar House

 Beatrice Mina Louise Coombs was born in Buckhorn Weston North Dorset 18th August 1892, one of six children to John and Elizabeth Coombs.John Coombs was born in1861. By the age of 20 in 1881 he was an agricultural labourer,he then went on to work for the council repairing roads with his 2 sons.

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In 1911 Beatrice was working as a housemaid – one of sixteen live-in staff, for the Earl & Countess of Melville & Leven in their London home and also at Kirtlington Park in Oxfordshire.

The Earl was only 24 – having lost his father in 1906.

Sadly, he was only to live another three years.
By co-incidence Frederick Morgan’s (of Ruperra Castle) great-grand-daughter and great grand-daughter live in Kirtlington.

Kirtlington Park near Oxford is now a prestige a wedding venue http://www.kirtlingtonpark.co.uk/

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Photo courtesy of Guy Collier Photography – http://guycollierphotography.com

In 1913 Beatrice came to Tredegar House as a housemaid. Maude Williams the Housekeeper was her cousin. Maude had previously worked for the Sturt family at their London home and at Crichel (Evan Morgan’s first wife was Lois Sturt) and no doubt encouraged her cousin to apply for the job.

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Crichel – where Lois Sturt was brought up. Have a look at her home in these wonderful Country Life photographs
http://www.countrylifeimages.co.uk/Search.aspx?s=crichel%20house

Beatrice met her future husband John Evans chauffer to both Courtenay Morgan and Evan Morgan. Look at the link on this website about the Servants and Estate Workers (under Tredegar House Topics) to read more of John (fondly known as Jack by the family) and his capture by Turk Rebels in 1916.

Link to article mentioned above.

http://www.friends-of-tredegar-house.co.uk/home/john-evans-chauffeur-to-lord-tredegar/

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Beatrice and John married in 1922 in Buckhorn Weston North Dorset in 1923 they had one son. They lived at Tredegar Park Cottages opposite Cleppa Park, an estate house that John’s parents & grandparents had lived in.
When John passed away in November 1965 Beatrice stayed in the house until the early 1970s, she then moved back to Buckhorn Weston to live with her sister. Beatrice passed away on 30th November 1976

Beatrice Mina Louise Coombs
What must have it been like for these young women to work in such grand houses when most of them had been brought up in humble surroundings?

 

Palleg Manor and The Morgans of Tredegar House

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Article submitted by Monty Dart

‘Palleg Manor’– 1215-1915’ is a thesis completed over the last four years by James Burton,  genealogist and antiquarian local to Aberdare. He says  ‘As a genealogist I have been chipping away at the old block for 14 years so I have gathered much experience in the  field. To study one’s forefathers is to know yourself  and what lies in your future. My initial interest in the  Palleg Manor came from the fact that my 7th generation  forefather, Richard Owen born 1762 happened to be listed as  a farmer on Penllwyn Teg farm, Ystradgynlais in the 1841  census (proven by extensive research over 10 years). It was  exciting to discover this, but I had no idea of the  importance of being head of a farm, or that it had a rich  history of being part of a feudal manor dating back eons. This revelation came by my delving into the vast and well  preserved estate records of the Landlord’s Tredegar in  Aberystwyth library. So much history I uncovered that I  decided I must extract it all for the use of future  generations and solve a puzzle that was questing me, how  long had my family been there and did this manor stretch  back to the Norman times and beyond?! The Morgan family of Tredegar House were the longest recorded and last owners of  the Manor see ‘Manor of Tredegar, Chief Tenants of  Palleg Manor, Ystradgynlais 1747 –  1915’.

The thesis and much more can be accessed on James Burton’s website

http://www.spookspring.com/Palleg/palleg.html

A history of the family of Morgan, from the year 1089 to present times- Written in 1902 by Appleton Morgan

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With thanks to Monty Dart For this link

Written in 1902 (limited to 500 copies) by Appleton Morgan (1845-1928)

A history of the family of Morgan, from the year 1089 to present times

It was acquired by New York Public Library

Written by an American Morgan claiming to be a 27th generation of Cadifor Fawr

The reader will discover many USA Morgans hitherto unknown.

An Interactive and searchable book and can be downloaded or read on-line.

Here is a direct link.

https://archive.org/stream/historyoffamilyo00morg#page/n9/mode/2up.

appleton morgan

The Muses of Evan, Viscount Tredegar

Evan & Words

Lord Tredegar’s biographer, William Cross, announces a new book on Evan Frederic Morgan,

the “ fairy prince of modern times”

The new book is RRP of £8.00 + p&p

p & p UK £3.00; Europe £5.00; Other £7.50.

ALSO ON AMAZON

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Tredegar-Selected-Letters-Prose-Quotations/dp/1905914334/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1439818422&sr=1-3

Otherwise orders to 58, Sutton Road, Newport, Gwent, NP 19 7JF

Web link for further information on the book:

http://tilly-losch-secrets.yolasite.com/evan-morgan-lord–tredegar–letters-poetry–prose.php

Blurb 1

 

 

Blue Plaques In Newport

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Thanks to Cyril Highman of The Newport Civic Society for the following

CITY OF NEWPORT BLUE PLAQUES
Erected at sites of historical, natural or architectural interest in Newport

DOS NAIL WORKS AND COTTAGES. Built 1835 for J.J. Cordes, later of Brynglas House. It was the first large local factory and ran an evening class for its child employees.
Location: Factory Road (aptly named), a turning off Mill Street. The plaque is affixed to the still surviving office building, Cordes House.

THE WESTGATE HOTEL. Rebuilt 1885, still on the site of the town’s medieval western gateway. Here in 1839 troops repulsed the Chartists. Doric columns which flanked the portico are retained.
Location. A prominent city centre site at the junction of Commercial Street and Stow Hill. No longer in use as a hotel. Listed Grade 2.

THE CATTLE MARKET. Built in 1844 by the Tredegar Wharf Co. which earlier developed Pillgwenlly. For centuries before, produce and livestock had been traded in High Street.
Location: Off Commercial Road in an area bounded by Ruperra Street, West Market Street, East Market Street and South Market Street. South range, Listed Grade 2. The market site was cleared for re-development as a supermarket in 2010..

PARK SQUARE TRANSFORMER. From 1895 rubber-covered cable carried 2000 volt A.C. current from Newport’s first power station in Llanarth Street to transformers which reduced it to 200 volt for supplying the wealthier householders.
Location: Park Square (lying between Stow Hill and Commercial Street) Listed Grade 2. A similar example is located in Graham Street, Baneswell

THE OLD TOWN DOCK. Crowded river moorings proved inadequate for Newport’s expanding coal and iron trade. The first enclosed dock covering over four acres was built in 1842. Extended in 1858 it was filled in in 1931.
Location: From the southern end of Lower Dock Street it extended to what is now the Southern Distributor Road. The plaque is affixed to a listed building known as the Malt House

THE CUSTOM HOUSE. As ship movements concentrated ever further down river, ship brokers, chandlers, consulates and bonded warehouses became established in Lower Dock Street. H.M. Customs moved here from Skinner Street in 1858.
Location: Lower Dock Street. Listed Grade 2.

CAMBRIAN HOUSE. Built in 1854 for Thomas Spittle, who developed the Cambrian Foundry on a site later known as Spittle’s Point. He also owned works on the east bank where three iron ships were launched.
Location: St John’s Road, off Chepstow Road. Listed Grade 2.

PREACHING CROSS. This marks the original position of the town’s preaching cross. The base of the cross is now situated in the graveyard of Newport Cathedral.
Location: Stow Hill at its junction with Havelock Street. Note the reproduction town cross erected in High Street

BANESWELL. Before piped water in 1848, Newport’s 19,000 inhabitants drew from springs and wells as in medieval times. Districts were named after wells, though cholera and typhoid epidemics indicate they were not a pure supply.
Location: Pump Street, Baneswell Note the district named Eveswell on the Chepstow Road side of Newport

VICTORIA PLACE. Rennie-Hill, builders of the Town Dock erected this Regency style terrace on land given by William Townsend to provide access to Stow Hill from the south-east.
Location: Stow Hill, some 200 yards below the Cathedral. Listed Grade 2 (nos. 1 – 13 consequtively)

CRINDAU HOUSE. 1580 on moulded porch entry. Initials H.M. with date probably refer to Humphrey Morgan of Llantarnam who married Katherine Herbert, heiress of Crindau.
Location: Chelston Place, off Redland Street, Malpas Road

THE RAGGED SCHOOL. A national charitable movement provided Ragged Schools for children unable to pay to attend the National and British Schools run by the churches.
Location: Junction of Lower Dock Street and Mellon Street

THE FRIARS. Home of Octavius Morgan (1803-88). Antiquarian and horologist brother of 1st Lord Tredegar, M.P. for Monmouthshire 1841-74. Initiator of archaeological fieldwork at Caerwent and Caerleon and the Legionary Museum.
Location: Friars Road near its junction with Belle Vue Lane. Now occupied by the local health authority. Listed Grade 2.

TREDEGAR ESTATES OFFICE (1905). Formerly extending into Glamorganshire and Breconshire, the Tredegar Estate was, until its dispersal in 1956, the County’s biggest landowner. Here its records were kept and its rents paid.
Location: Pentonville, adjoining Mill Street. Surviving records are now lodged in the National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth. Listed Grade 2.

BOUNDARY STONE. This marked the limit of the town from its medieval origins until 1835, when its first extension took in the workhouse (now part of St Woolos Hospital) and Pillgwenlly,
Location: Newport Cathedral raised walkway alongside Stow Hill. Visible only from the roadway.

JAMES FLEWITT MULLOCK 1818-1892. To commemorate the life of a Victorian Newportonian – artist – art teacher – bibliophile – educational reformer – bon vivant – horticulturalist and clerk to Newport and St Woolos Burial Board, the first municipal body of its kind in Britain.
Location: St Woolos Cemetery, Bassaleg Road, Affixed to former Keeper’s Lodge, inside entrance gates.

EMLYN ENGINEERING WORKS, The Newport Centre is built on the site of the former Emlyn Engineering Works opened in 1857 and owned by Charles D. Phillips. The works were a major iron foundry supporting colliery, shipping and railway interests.
Location: The Newport Centre, Kingsway. Note adjoining Emlyn Street.

GEORGE PHILIP REYNOLDS 1864-1907. Founder in 1887 of the Boys’ Brigade in Wales. The movement began at this church as the 1st Newport Company, which still meets in the City. The church was listed Grade II in 1997 for its polychromate italianate style.
Location: Havelock Street Presbyterian Church, Havelock Street, off Stow Hill.

NEWPORT PROVISIONS MARKET. Built in 1854, an early example of a large span cast iron frame building featuring its glass-filled barrel roof. The Dock Street offices and tower were constructed later in 1887.
Location: Upper Dock Street extending through into High Street. The plaque is mounted at the Dock Street end. Listed Grade 2.

JAMES MATTHEWS. Chief Librarian of Newport from 1875 to 1917. Author of ‘Historic Newport’, one of the few histories of the town, published in 1910 and reproduced by Newport Library in 1996. Previously closely involved in setting up the first children’s library in England.
Location: Newport Central Library and Museum, John Frost Square.

NEWPORT TOWN HALL. Stood with its imposing clock tower on this site from 1842 to 1960. The office transferred to the new Civic Centre in 1950. Field Marshal Sir Bernard Law Montgomery addressed the citizens from its gallery when granted the Freedom of Newport in 1945.
Location: British Home Stores, on the completely reconstructed site in Commercial Street

THE OLD POST OFFICE. Site of Newport’s first Head Post Office built in 1844 and re-built in 1907, the Edwardian facade being preserved in the total reconstruction of the island site in 2001. Once housed the town’s first telephone exchange, known as ‘The Savoy’. Listed Grade 2 in 1985.
Location: High Street. Note its siting close to the railway station where mail was delivered and despatched and to which it was connected by its own subway

ODEON CINEMA Designed in the Art Deco style by Arthur Price. One of a chain of cinemas created by Oscar Deutsch in the Thirties. A rare surviving example in Wales of the Odeon style. Listed Grade 2 in 1999.
Location: Clarence Place.

NEWPORT HARBOUR COMMISSIONERS LANDING STAGE. Paddle steamers of P & A Campbell’s famous White Funnel Fleet regularly sailed from near this point. Opened in the 1880s, extended in the mid-1890s and closed in the 1950s.
Location: South-eastern end of Newport Town Bridge. Newport Town Bridge is Listed Grade 2.

TREDEGAR HOUSE. For 500 years until 1951 the ancestral home of the Morgans of Tredegar. Listed Grade 1 as one of the finest restoration houses in Britain. Now in the care of Newport City Council.
Location: Cardiff Road near Junction 28 of the M4 Motorway. The House is surrounded by some 90 acres of beautiful Parkland. The plaque is mounted on its south-east face overlooking the cobbled service courtyard. The estate was leased to The National Trust in 2012.

JOHN FROST, 1784-1877. Chartist, Mayor of Newport 1836-7. Born Thomas Street.
Location: Thomas Street no longer exists as a public thoroughfare and has been absorbed behind a glazed facade linking the Old Post Office with the re-built Corn Exchange offices.

WILLIAM HENRY DAVIES, 1871-1940. Newport born poet and author.
‘What is this life, if, full of care, we have no time to stand and stare ……..’
Two years after his birth in 6 Portland Street, William was taken into care by his paternal grandparents, proprietors of the nearby Church House Inn. The plaque was unveiled by John Masefield, Poet Laureate, in 1938. William died two years later on 26th September, 1940.

MAI JONES, 1899-1960. ‘We’ll keep a welcome in the hillsides’
Welsh songwriter, producer of radio show ‘Welsh Rarebit’ and entertainer
Resident at 19 St Mark’s Crescent, Newport
Plaque unveiled on 7th May 2010, the 50th anniversary of her death

WETLANDS RESERVE, Uskmouth East
Plaque unveiled 2nd March 2000 by the Chairman of the Cardiff Bay Development Corporation.
A major nature reserve acquired, designed and implemented in mitigation for the removal of the Taff Ely SSSI between 1996 and 1999. It was a joint project of the Land Authority for Wales and the Cardiff Bay Development Corporation

NEWPORT SHIP. In 2002 the remains of a large merchant-ship, dating from the fifteenth century, were discovered on this site.
LLONG CASNEWYDD, Yn 2002, ar y safle hwn, cafwyd hyd i olion llongfasnach fawr yn dyddio’n o’l i’r bymthegfed ganrif
Newport Riverfront Theatre. Unveiled jointly by Newport Civic Society and The Friends of the Newport Ship in October 2011

BELLE VUE PARK. Opened in 1894 by Lord Tredegar. Designed by Thomas Mawson, landscape architect, Windermere. Restored 2006 with aid of Heritage Lottery Fund.
PARC BELLE VUE, agorwyd yn 1894 gan Arglwydd Tredegar. Cynllunlwyd gan Thomas Mawson, Pensarn Tirlun, Windermere. Adferwyd yn 2006 gan Gyngor Dinas Casnewydd, gyda chymorth Cronfa Dredtadaeth y Loteri.

LADY RHONDDA – Margaret Haig Mackworth Suffragette and Editor
Set fire to letter-box in cemetery wall in Risca Road in June 1913 Plaque erected at house adjoining in June 2015

Link to Lady Rhondda

Revised June 2015 NE WPORT CIVIC SOCIETY
www.newportcivic.org
Registered Charity No. 700399 City of Newport Blue Plaques Revised2.doc
No 28 070510
City of Newport Blue Plaques Revised2.doc

 

NEW BOOK BY WILL CROSS – LOIS INA STURT

LOIS COVER worked on

Lois Sturt, Wild Child : A Glance at Hon. Lois Ina Sturt, Viscountess Tredegar

New Book By William Cross : Now Available £8.00 Post Free UK

From the age of the flapper, with vivid yarns of those Bright Young Things comes the poignant tale of British high society wild child, the Honourable Lois Ina Sturt, a dazzling, single minded,one-off personality who was dead by the age of 37. Sibling of the enigmatic, hedonistic peer Lord ‘Naps’ Alington, the family pile was the magical Crichel Estate in Dorset. The blond, tubercular Naps was matched only in devil may care attitude by his younger sister Lois, a delectable, quixotic creature,an accomplished actress and dancer, a clever painter who studied at the Slade School of Art and had her own art studio in Chelsea. She also became a successful race horse owner and breeder of Great Danes. But Lois’ story is largely untold. She was deemed “fast” and “high-spirited”: Lois wanted to knock the stuffing out of convention and achieved this by engaging in several long love affairs, generally with older, married men. She was for four years the lover of the much older Reggie Herbert, 15th Earl of Pembroke, and an intimate around the string of unapproved-of good-time girls chasing Prince George, the ill-fated Duke of Kent. In 1928 Lois entered into an arranged, madcap marriage de convenance with the homosexual Hon. Evan Frederic Morgan, heir to the Viscount Tredegar and died suddenly in Budapest in 1937, a victim of long years of alcohol abuse and insane slimming treatments. Author of previous titles on several forgotten Society figures of the 1920s and 1930s, William Cross presents all the humorous anecdotes, coupled with fascinating, yet often sad facts on the boisterous life and times of Evan Morgan’s first wife Lois, Viscountess Tredegar. Incredibly, Lois may boast a blood connection to the current heir to the British throne. ISBN 10 1-905914-31-8 and ISBN 13 978-1-905914-31-9

Published by William P. Cross through Book Midden Publishing 58 Sutton Road, Newport, Gwent NP19 7JF, United Kingdom   £8.00 Post Free UK until 31 December 2014

OVERSEAS ORDERS PLEASE USE AMAZON Cheques/ POs payable to “ William Cross”

 williecross@virginmedia.com

 A new book from William Cross, FSA Scot on Lois Sturt, actress, painter and first wife of Evan Morgan, later Viscount Tredegar. Lois died in Budapest in 1937, aged 37. She was one of the brightest of the Bright Young Things, but doomed because of her quest for fun and high living. Lois was Viscountess Tredegar from 1934 -1937.

A link to article from The Daily Telegraph

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/luxury/art/62799/ambrose-mcevoy-portrait-of-lois-sturt-exceeds-estimate-at-dreweatts-saleroom.html

FOLLOW BLOG ON LOIS STURT

 http://lois-sturt.blogspot.co.uk/

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Lois by Tony Wysard (1907-1984) Caricaturist & Fashion Editor

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LOIS COVER FOR FOTH

 

 

 

 

Evan Frederic Morgan: Viscount Tredegar : The Final Affairs : Financial and Carnal. by Will Cross

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Newport Author William Cross

Evan Frederic Morgan: Viscount Tredegar :

The Final Affairs : Financial and Carnal.

Available Now

Click on the link below, which has the synopsis of the book

http://screwpacketplaywrights.yolasite.com/Evan-Viscount-Tredegar-The-Final-Affairs.php

Any enquiries, please e-mail Will Cross

williecross@virginmedia.com

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Newport ˜Screwpacket Playwrights”

The Forgotten :

A Chartist Musical, which can be seen at the Riverfront Theatre
On 19th and 20th November
And other South Wales venues :
Llandogo Millennium Hall ( 22nd November )
Chepstows Drill Hall ( 27th November)
Savoy Theatre, Monmouth ( 5th December)

Opening of the Alexandra Dock Newport

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In this photo Prince Arthur is in the front, Courtenay is behind him and Evan is behind Mather-Jackson (Lord Lieutenant) who is wearing a top hat. It was the day after Evan’s 21st birthday.

I have recently been involved in an exhibition to commemorate the 100th  anniversary of the opening of Alexandra Dock by the Duke of Connaught. It was one of Courtenay’s proudest moments – as Liberty sailed into the Dock (most of the Morgan family were aboard) and Prince Arthur cut the ribbon.  I still don’t understand how you put a ribbon across a dock. Let alone cut it when you are on a boat!  I hope you enjoy this animation by the children of Pillgwenlly Primary School.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Frl88o75HnQ

The film refers to the Newport Dock Disaster – this is an 8 min film about the event

the original is about 45 mins    watch  it here      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UEVB_nlobgk

 

 Monty Dart

 

 

 

Reunited

Martyn,Elizabeth,Paul

Martyn,Elizabeth,Paul
At the Edeny Gates

Hi Annie and Monty
Annie a big thank you for the photo’s you sent me.

Article for the website.

August 15th 2013 is a day I will always remember. I received an email from Annie Parker,
ref an email she had received through the website from Elizabeth Rassmussen who
lives with her husband Paul in the United States.

Elizabeth’s sister & brother had visited Tredegar House & had seen the photo of John Evans the chauffeur (my grandfather) on the wall.

Her sister mentioned to Elizabeth about this & Elizabeth sent the email to the website.

After a couple of days Annie passed on Elizabeth’s email address to me. I was then able to send an email with the family history which goes back three generations of working at Tredegar House.

Elizabeth & I have been in contact ever since

Elizabeth’s connection to the Evans family is through John Evans’ older sister; Lucy who married William Henry Lyons in Newport. They had three children – Elizabeth’s father Hayden Desire Lyons plus two Daughters. Hayden then married & moved to Birmingham. He was an oboe player in the Birmingham Symphony Orchestra…

I happened to mention to Elizabeth about a talk at Tredegar House about the servants in the 1900,s by Monty Dart which was on June 11th.  I was overjoyed when Elizabeth & Paul said they would be coming over to visit family & friends & would be visiting Newport for two days and could
to come to the talk & also to meet up for the first time. I travelled up from Christchurch in Dorset &
met up with them at her brothers in Bristol. They then travelled with me to Newport.
In the evening we went to a wonderful talk by Monty who used some of my photos.
Elizabeth’s brother & sister from Bristol also came over, also my brother from Newport.

The next day I took Elizabeth & Paul to see the house that the Evans family had lived in for over 120 years.

Elizabeth was taking a photo of the house when the owner walked up to us.we explained about house and the connection to us.
We then were invited inside what is now one large house. It used to be four cottages.
To sit in what would have been Nan & Pops lounge for the first time in 40 years for me &
Elizabeth it was so wonderful.
In the afternoon we were invited by Monty & Annie to go around Tredegar House & the
gardens, we were overjoyed. We then went back to my brother & sister in laws for the evening. What a wonderful 2 days.

Martyn Evans

Elizabeth and Paul

Elizabeth and Paul
At the Dining table
In the Brown Room

Sir Briggs The Original War Horse

 The Original War Horse.

A visitor will find the grave of Sir Briggs in the Cedar Garden of Tredegar House.

The Friends of Tredegar House, are so pleased to announce:

that after consultation With The National Trust

We are to provide funds for the restoration of the grave,

Which is now completed

The inscription reads:

In Memory of Sir Briggs

Favourite charger. He carried his master the Hon. Godfrey Morgan, Captain 17th Lancers boldly and well at the Battle of Alma, in the first line of the Light Cavalry Charge at Balaclava and the battle of Inkerman, 1854.

Sir BriggsHe died at Tredegar Park February 6th 1874. Aged 28 years.

Sir Briggs was bought in 1851, the same year he won the hunt Steeple Chase at Cowbridge. When the Crimea war broke out, the most sensible thing would have been to send horses and men by steam ship to the Black Sea. It wasn’t to be. Sir Briggs set sail from Portsmouth in 1854 on board the Edmundsbury, a sailing ship carrying forty horses, four of which belonged to Godfrey. They lost horses to seasickness. ‘Atheist’ Captain Morgan’s 2nd charger died and was thrown overboard. Other horses continued to die.

The vessel stopped briefly at Malta, and by 19 May had reached the Dardanelles. The vessel anchored at Constantinople for four days. The regiment had lost twenty six horses, and others continued to die.

The troops then embarked for the Bulgarian port of Varna. The Bulgarian phase ended when the Turks took Silistria, and the Russians retreated.

At the Crimea, the cavalry remained largely inactive. It was not until Balaclava, that bloody action was seen. The exact numbers taking part in the charge is controversial, and put between 661 and 673. After the charge only 195 came back. Sir Briggs received a sabre cut to the forehead.

Inkerman followed. Horses became ‘hog-maned’ and ‘rat-tailed’. Many died from starvation.

Godfrey Morgan became sick and returned to Constantinople. Sir Briggs remained in the Crimea with his brother Frederick Morgan, and was used as his staff horse. In the same year that Sebastopol fell, Sir Briggs won the military steeplechase at Sebastopol.

In 1855 Sir Briggs returned to Tredegar House, where he was finally buried.

Sir Briggs’s Monument in the Cedar Gardens

Article by Monty Dart

National Army Museum article about Sir Briggs (click here)

 

Copyright © 2012 Friends of Tredegar House