Day Trip to Charlecote Park Warwick

DAY TRIP TUESDAY 13TH JUNE 2017

Our summer day trip this year is  to  Charlecote Park, Wellesbourne, Warwick. Charlecote Park has been the home of the Lucy family since the 13th century.   It is  a magnificent  Tudor  mansion  beside  the River Avon, on  the  foundations of  an  even earlier medieval house.

Queen Elizabeth I is known to have visited the house, and stayed in the chamber that now serves as the drawing room.

The Lucy family came to England as supporters of William the Conqueror, and the family has owned’land at Charlecote since 1247. Sir Thomas Lucy (1532-1600), the builder of the current house, was a magistrate under Elizabeth 1. In the course of his duties he was responsible for prosecuting local families with Catholic sympathies, including the Arden family, William Shakespeare’s maternal grandparents.

Tradition says that William Shakespeare was once caught poaching deer on the Charlecote Estate. This tale may well be true, as the estate lies close to Shakespeare’s family home at Stratford. The story goes that Shakespeare was forced to flee the area to avoid prosecution by Sir Thomas. The young playwright escaped to London and the rest, as they say, is history.

Eating and shopping: The Orangery serves a range of meals and light snacks. The Servants Hall gift shop and Pantry  shop  sell a range  of specific and  locally sourced produce.   Picnics welcome.

We will be leaving Tredegar House Car Park at 9.15am prompt. Arriving At Charlecote Park approximately 11.30am.

ADMISSION  PRICES –

  1. House and Garden including coach……………………………………..£24.60 each
  1. Coach only for National Trust members……………………………….£14.60 each

BOOK EARLY SO AS NOT TO BE DISAPPOINTED.

BALANCE REQUIRED NO LATER THAN_ 6 WEEKS PRIOR TO TRIP

3RD  MAY 2017.

Contact Judith Rice:

judith.rice@friends-of-tredegar-house.co.uk

George Gould Morgan and The Alford Family

image001-001

 

We recently received this wonderful account of The Alford family from Judith Coupar – it tells us of George Gould Morgan – George is part of The Morgan family we do not ever hear of.  It is very intersting account.

My name is Judith Coupar and I live in Perth Western Australia, having migrated here with my parents in 1949, aged 3 years.  My great grandfather, James Alford, was butler to Godfrey Charles Morgan, 1st and last Viscount Tredegar from about 1875 to about 1914. 

When Viscount Tredegar’s mother, Lady Rosamund Morgan (was made Baroness Tredegar on 16 April 1859 died in 1883), he was was installed in one of the Morgan family’s London houses (11 Cambridge Square, Hyde Park) to look after Lord Godfrey Morgan’s youngest brother, George Gould Morgan (born 15.9.1845, died 3.3.1907). he carried out his duties for almost 27 years.

George Gould Morgan was physically and mentally impaired,  

I do not believe James and Elizabeth Alford returned to Tredegar House following George Gould Morgan’s death in 1907 as they continued to live at the Cambridge Square House even after “Godfrey the Good’s” death in 1913, and probably until their deaths in the 1920/30 era.  This London house continued to be  used by other Morgan family members and acquaintances when they visited London, and George & Elizabeth Alford “kept” this house for the Morgan family, along with another housekeeper (Ada Spendlove) who lived with them there, and whom James Alford “hired” at the age of 15, when, in 1885, he found her crying on the steps of the Cambridge Square house, asking for a job.

Ada Spendlove lived with our family for 60 years, never married, looked after 3 generations of our family, and died at our home in Hanwell, West London,  on Christmas eve, 1945, when I was one month old. 

James Alford married a dairymaid, Elizabeth Player in March 1885 and they had an only child, Ethel Alford, my grandmother.  Ethel was born in December 1885 whilst they lived at the Cambridge Square address and she only left there when she married John Douglas on 30 May 1914.
 
Ethel told us that it was quite a task for her parents, looking after the Hon. George.  He was prone to fits and was quite gullible.  Apparently, the housemaids along Cambridge Square would “egg him on”.  George had no sense of values, giving sometimes expensive presents and then, just the stub of a pencil.  Ethel also said he would often say ….. “Pack my bags James.  I am going to elope”.

 

Mirror & butler serving dish

image0012FROM THE ARCHIVES

Hon. George Gould Morgan was born on 15 September 1845.1 He was the son of Charles Morgan Robinson Morgan, 1st Baron Tredegar and Rosamund Mundy.1 He died on 3 March 1907 at age 61, unmarried1.Hon. Fanny Henrietta Morgan+3 d. 2 Sep 1887

2.Hon. Georgiana Charlotte Morgan4 d. 22 Apr 1886

3.Hon. Mary Anna Morgan+3 d. 14 Aug 1924

4.Hon. Selina Maria Morgan1 d. 31 Mar 1922

5.Hon. Rosamond Marion Tredegar+3 d. 15 Jan 1883

6.Charles Rodney Morgan1 b. 2 Dec 1828, d. 14 Jan 1854

7.Godfrey Charles Morgan, 1st and last Viscount Tredegar1 b. 28 Apr 1831, d. 11 Mar 1913

8.Hon. Frederic Courtenay Morgan+1 b. 24 May 1834, d. 9 Jan 1909

9.Hon. Ellen Sarah Morgan+5 b. 1836, d. 19 May 1912

10.Hon. Arthur John Morgan1 b. 27 Aug 1840, d. 9 Nov 1900

11.Hon. George Gould Morgan1 b. 15 Sep 1845, d. 3 Mar 1907
 

Godfrey Morgan Gentleman Rider

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 VISCOUNT TREDEGAR

GENTLEMEN RIDERS – PAST AND PRESENT

By JOHN MAUNSELL RICHARDSON, FINCH MASON & JOHNA.SEAVERNS

1909

Familiar as the name of the popular nobleman who forms the subject of this chapter must necessarily be, not only in the Principality, but throughout the length and breadth of the land as one of the staunchest friends of agriculture and all that

pertains to it the cause has ever possessed, it is probably news to the present generation, who may have only heard of him as a sportsman in connection with the Tredegar Hunt, of which he was master for so many years, that in his younger days

there were few more accomplished horsemen, both over a country and on the flat, than the subject of our memoir, and certainly none more popular; the roar of delight which went up all along the line when the purple and orange sleeves were

seen in the van at Cardiff or Abergavenny, more especially when sported by their owner, being something to remember.

 Godfrey Charles Morgan, first Viscount Tredegar, son of the first Baron Tredegar, and his wife Rosamund, only daughter of General Godfrey Basil Mundy, was born on the 28th April, 1830, at Ruperra Castle, in Glamorganshire, and on leaving Eton, joined the 17th Lancers, with which gallant regiment he served in the Crimean War, being lucky enough not only to participate in the historic charge of the Light

Brigade at Balaclava, but to emerge scatheless from the melie. It was soon after joining his regiment, in 1853, that Colonel Godfrey Morgan, as he then was, made his debut in the saddle, when he rode a horse called Fringe in a flat race at

Woolwich, his next appearance being at Newport, in Monmouthshire, in the course by the river-side, where the Newport rowing-club boathouse now stands, on which occasion he rode a grey mare named Miss Banks, belonging to Mr. Fothergill

Rowlands, in a hurdle race, coming in second to a horse called The General.

In the same year he won the principal steeplechase at Cowbridge on Mr. Briggs, belonging to his elder brother, which horse accompanied him later on to the Crimea, and was his mount in the Balaclava charge.

After the Peace, in 1855, Captain Godfrey Morgan retired from the Army, and gave himself up almost entirely to sports of the field, in which steeplechasing took a prominent place. Cardiff, Cowbridge, and Abergavenny — which last is described

by Mr. Thomas Pickernell as one of the stiffest courses he ever rode across — being his favourite battle-grounds. At Cowbridge he won the principal steeplechase, and was second in the next race on a horse called Peeping Tom, whilst the Hunt

and open steeplechases at Abergavenny fell to his share with Gadfly and General Bosquet respectively ; the first-named race being won again a second time by him on a horse named Bowles. Whilst still in the Service, Captain Godfrey Morgan steered the second in the light-weight Military Steeple-chase at Warwick ; and later on, at Melton, he won the first point-to-point steeplechase which ever took place there, on Mystery, his brother, Colonel The Hon. Fred Morgan, being second.

From 1858 to 1875, in which year he succeeded to the title, Lord Tredegar represented Brecknock in Parliament in the Conservative interest, and he still retains the Mastership of the Hunt which bears his name.

COLONEL THE HON. F. C. MORGAN

Until quite late into the seventies of the past century, none of the race meetings in South Wales, such as Cardiff, Abergavenny, and Monmouth, would have been considered perfect without the presence in their respective saddling paddocks of

the good sportsman named above ; and it would have been considered equally out of place if during the day the popular purple and orange hoops and black cap, worn by their owner, were not seen in the van more than once during the day’s

proceedings, either on horses belonging to himself or his brother, Lord Tredegar.

The third son of the first Lord Tredegar, the subject of our memoir, was born in 1834, and, his education over, joined the Rifle Brigade, in which distinguished regiment he served in the Crimean War, seeing a good deal of service during the time he was there.

After his marriage. Colonel Morgan settled down in Glamorganshire, where he lived the life of a country gentleman, for which he was so eminently fitted. For many years almost the entire management of the Tredegar Hunt, belonging to Lord Tredegar, devolved on him in the Master’s absence ; whilst there can be no doubt that it was to his own influence and the generous support of the Tredegar family that the various race meetings in the locality owed in a great measure their success. It was no uncommon thing to see the two brothers, Lord Tredegar and Colonel Fred Morgan, riding together in thesame race ; and on one of these occasions, in a friendly match

over hurdles, to decide the merits of two of their hunters,

Colonel Morgan’s horse, who was on the inside all the way, in jumping the last flight, not only cleared the corner hurdle, but the rails as well, landing handsomely amongst the crowd, and as a consequence had to retrace his steps, thereby enabling

Lord Tredegar to win at his leisure. The amusing part of the story was that the natives went away firmly convinced in their own minds that Colonel Morgan’s jump over the rails, so far from being an accident, was prompted by an amiable desire on his part not to defeat his brother.

The subject of this memoir, who died to every one’s great regret on January 8th, 1909, represented Monmouthshire in the Conservative interest for thirty years, being only deprived of his seat at the last general election, and was, from its foundation, one of the most active members of the N. H. committee.

This antiquarian book – written in 1909 can be had for £299 on internet

 But read it here for FREE. Click on link below – when open scroll down to read.

http://archive.org/stream/gentlemenridersp00rich/gentlemenridersp00rich_djvu.txt

 

Reunited

Martyn,Elizabeth,Paul

Martyn,Elizabeth,Paul
At the Edeny Gates

Hi Annie and Monty
Annie a big thank you for the photo’s you sent me.

Article for the website.

August 15th 2013 is a day I will always remember. I received an email from Annie Parker,
ref an email she had received through the website from Elizabeth Rassmussen who
lives with her husband Paul in the United States.

Elizabeth’s sister & brother had visited Tredegar House & had seen the photo of John Evans the chauffeur (my grandfather) on the wall.

Her sister mentioned to Elizabeth about this & Elizabeth sent the email to the website.

After a couple of days Annie passed on Elizabeth’s email address to me. I was then able to send an email with the family history which goes back three generations of working at Tredegar House.

Elizabeth & I have been in contact ever since

Elizabeth’s connection to the Evans family is through John Evans’ older sister; Lucy who married William Henry Lyons in Newport. They had three children – Elizabeth’s father Hayden Desire Lyons plus two Daughters. Hayden then married & moved to Birmingham. He was an oboe player in the Birmingham Symphony Orchestra…

I happened to mention to Elizabeth about a talk at Tredegar House about the servants in the 1900,s by Monty Dart which was on June 11th.  I was overjoyed when Elizabeth & Paul said they would be coming over to visit family & friends & would be visiting Newport for two days and could
to come to the talk & also to meet up for the first time. I travelled up from Christchurch in Dorset &
met up with them at her brothers in Bristol. They then travelled with me to Newport.
In the evening we went to a wonderful talk by Monty who used some of my photos.
Elizabeth’s brother & sister from Bristol also came over, also my brother from Newport.

The next day I took Elizabeth & Paul to see the house that the Evans family had lived in for over 120 years.

Elizabeth was taking a photo of the house when the owner walked up to us.we explained about house and the connection to us.
We then were invited inside what is now one large house. It used to be four cottages.
To sit in what would have been Nan & Pops lounge for the first time in 40 years for me &
Elizabeth it was so wonderful.
In the afternoon we were invited by Monty & Annie to go around Tredegar House & the
gardens, we were overjoyed. We then went back to my brother & sister in laws for the evening. What a wonderful 2 days.

Martyn Evans

Elizabeth and Paul

Elizabeth and Paul
At the Dining table
In the Brown Room

Sir Briggs The Original War Horse

 The Original War Horse.

A visitor will find the grave of Sir Briggs in the Cedar Garden of Tredegar House.

The Friends of Tredegar House, are so pleased to announce:

that after consultation With The National Trust

We are to provide funds for the restoration of the grave,

Which is now completed

The inscription reads:

In Memory of Sir Briggs

Favourite charger. He carried his master the Hon. Godfrey Morgan, Captain 17th Lancers boldly and well at the Battle of Alma, in the first line of the Light Cavalry Charge at Balaclava and the battle of Inkerman, 1854.

Sir BriggsHe died at Tredegar Park February 6th 1874. Aged 28 years.

Sir Briggs was bought in 1851, the same year he won the hunt Steeple Chase at Cowbridge. When the Crimea war broke out, the most sensible thing would have been to send horses and men by steam ship to the Black Sea. It wasn’t to be. Sir Briggs set sail from Portsmouth in 1854 on board the Edmundsbury, a sailing ship carrying forty horses, four of which belonged to Godfrey. They lost horses to seasickness. ‘Atheist’ Captain Morgan’s 2nd charger died and was thrown overboard. Other horses continued to die.

The vessel stopped briefly at Malta, and by 19 May had reached the Dardanelles. The vessel anchored at Constantinople for four days. The regiment had lost twenty six horses, and others continued to die.

The troops then embarked for the Bulgarian port of Varna. The Bulgarian phase ended when the Turks took Silistria, and the Russians retreated.

At the Crimea, the cavalry remained largely inactive. It was not until Balaclava, that bloody action was seen. The exact numbers taking part in the charge is controversial, and put between 661 and 673. After the charge only 195 came back. Sir Briggs received a sabre cut to the forehead.

Inkerman followed. Horses became ‘hog-maned’ and ‘rat-tailed’. Many died from starvation.

Godfrey Morgan became sick and returned to Constantinople. Sir Briggs remained in the Crimea with his brother Frederick Morgan, and was used as his staff horse. In the same year that Sebastopol fell, Sir Briggs won the military steeplechase at Sebastopol.

In 1855 Sir Briggs returned to Tredegar House, where he was finally buried.

Sir Briggs’s Monument in the Cedar Gardens

Article by Monty Dart

National Army Museum article about Sir Briggs (click here)

 

‘Fantastic mum’ had big impact on Newport’s Tredegar House

‘Fantastic mum’ had big impact on Newport’s Tredegar House

 Article In The South Wales Argus    8:14am Friday 31st January 2014 in News

 th

A STALWART supporter of one of Newport’s biggest visitor attractions has died following a short illness.

 Phyllis Mary Roberts (nee Soffe), 91, was a founder member of the Friends of Tredegar House and part of a team of women who made and restored many of the soft fabrics which still adorn the house.

 Today the registered charitable organisation aims to conserve and spread public interest in the historical importance of Tredegar House.

 Mrs Roberts had a very active role as a founding member of the organisation and took part in re-enacting the history of the house.

 Her son Christopher Roberts said she loved playing the part of a parlour maid alongside her husband Frederick, who acted as a butler, during tours of the house for around 20 years.

 He said she was saddened when she grew too old to participate.

 Mrs Roberts, brought up in Pill, Newport, was the fourth child of five born to Sylvester Jesse Soffe and Frances Emilina (nee Williams).

 She had ambitions of becoming a pharmacist, but the financial climate meant she had to leave school before taking exams, to find work to help support the family.

 The Second World War intervened, and Mrs Roberts was employed in the office at the Royal Ordnance Factory off Corporation Road, where Bofors anti-aircraft guns were manufactured.

 Later, she recalled night shifts with dancing during the mid-shift meal break. The war exacted a heavy toll on Mrs Roberts and her family.

 Her brother Frederick (Ted), who had joined up along with her eldest brother Jack, was killed while working as a wireless operator when his aircraft crashed with the total loss of the crew.

 And later, her boyfriend Brynley Capel, who was in Bomber Command, was shot down and killed over Germany. In 1945 Mrs Roberts married Frederick and they had two children, Mr Roberts and Jane Paske.

 They lived in Malpas and later Gaer and, when she was in her 80s, she moved into Monmouth Court on Bassaleg Road leading an active life despite health problems.

 She enjoyed flower arranging and always loved poetry, reciting many pieces from memory, including Shakespeare’s sonnets.

 She had two grandchildren, Daniel and Chloe, and lived to hear of the birth of her great granddaughter Cordelia Lily (Dilly) on January 20.

 Christopher Roberts said: “She was a fantastic mother.”

 Her funeral will be held on February 12 at 1.30pm at the Gwent Crematorium.

Henry Morgan Pirate and Governor of Jamaica

Henry Morgan

Henry Morgan

 

One of the most asked questions at Tredegar House prior to the  National Trust was –What about Henry Morgan ?

For those wanting to know more about Henry Morgan the Pirate –  latterly the Governor of Jamaica.

A relative of the Morgan Family of Tredegar House – his portrait can be seen in the Brown Room there,(c) National Trust, Tredegar House; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Welsh genealogists of repute concur however in stating that he was the eldest son of Robert Morgan of Llanrhymney, a small estate in Glamorganshire, near Tredegar Castle, where he was born in 1635.  The year of his birth is ascertained with tolerable certainty as an affidavit made by him in Jamaica on the 21st November, 1671, definitely states his age as thirty-six.

The family of Tredegar was recognized as the head of the clan, of which the Morgans of Llanrhymney were a cadet branch.

Llanrhumney Hall

The book suggests that he was born in Llanrumney – this is apparently the place, Llanrumney Hall until recently a pub

The book can be read at the Gutenberg Press Canada Site by following this link:

 

http://w.w.w.gutenberg.ca/ebooks/cruikshank-henrymorgan/cruikshank-henrymorgan-oo-h-dir/cruikshank-henrymorgan-oo-h.html

NB :- When on the site scroll down to read book

 

THE LIFE OF SIR HENRY MORGAN WITH AN ACCOUNT OF  THE ENGLISH SETTLEMENT OF THE ISLAND OF JAMAICA  (1655-1688)

BY  BRIG.-GENERAL E. A. CRUIKSHANK, LL.D., F.R.S.C., F.R. Hist. S.

More Books about Henry Morgan

Sir Henry Morgan, the Buccaneer, Volume 1

Sir Henry Morgan the Buccaneer

The voyages and adventures of Capt. Barth. Sharp and others, in the South Sea

 henry

Letter from Courtney Morgan requesting funds for YMCA Wales

YMCA logo

The Morgan family were keen supporters of local initiatives for the youth of Newport. In 1919 Godfrey Morgan had offered land to the YMCA in Bassaleg for use as a sports filed, and the Tredegar Estate Office had made arrangements with the YMCA to purchase a suitable war surplice hut for a pavilion. In his book ‘The History and Diary of the Newport YMCA. 1869 to 1990’, (ISBN 0 907143 16 4), Ernest J.Bakewell, available from Newport Reference Library, he reflects on the work of the YMCA. In this letter written by Courtenay Morgan, Lord Tredegar – Courtenay is appealing for funds for the organisation. 

YMCA letter

Lady Of Mystery

Rachael The Mystery Lady

Article and Photos By Monty Dart

Lady of Mystery

 Where did she come from? Known fondly as ‘Rachael’ by the gardeners at Tredegar House,

The statue in the corner of the Cedar Garden is a lady of mystery.

The volunteer hosts are developing short Garden Tours and it would be interesting to know her origins.

Rumour has it that she was brought to Tredegar House by the Nuns of St Josephs

But do you know the how she came to be there? Let us know.

 

 

Spring 2013 has arrived –
the Hellebores are in flower despite the recent snow

Godfrey Morgan, Viscount Tredegar Opening the Transporter Bridge

 

Here is a photograph of Godfrey Morgan, Viscount Tredegar on the opening day September 12th 1906. When the big day arrived, the rain was relentless, as you can see in the photograph, everyone has an umbrella.

 

 

 

 

 

 

From Monty Dart the archivist for the Friends of Tredegar House.

 Recently I received an intriguing email from America

 ‘I am the current Historian for the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology’s (SDSMT) American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) chapter.  Our chapter recently acquired what appears to be a cigar cutter from the Newport Transporter Bridge.  An alumni of SDSMT bought this cigar cutter at an antiques store and had it on his mantle for several years.  In 2007 he donated it to SDSMT.  He recently sent us a letter and was wondering if we still had it.  We found it.  The alumni would like us to get it to someone who will appreciate it, hopefully its rightful owner.’

 Attached was a photograph of a magnificent silver cigar cutter with a request to know more about the Transporter Bridge, Godfrey Morgan and Tredegar House. I was pleased to send the American Society of Engineers a film about Tredegar House and coincidently, as I am also the archivist for The Friends of Newport Transporter Bridge I could send details about the Bridge and the Opening Day.  This is where the cigar cutter comes in, it was presented to Godfrey as a memento of the opening of the Transporter Bridge by the Contractors – Alfred Thorne Ltd. This newspaper article mentions it as a ‘silver controller’. It was so called because the little handle that opened the cutter is an exact replica of the handle Godfrey used to start the Transporter Bridge!

 Just a week after our initial correspondence by email I received a surprise parcel from America. Our generous friends from South Dakota had sent the unique artefact, a real piece of Newport history.  I have accepted it ‘on behalf of the people of Newport’ and the Friends are discussing where best it could be displayed.

 

This animation of both the cigar cutter and the Transporter Bridge in action

was made by Tom Dart for the FOTH website.

 

 

Link to Mary Courtney MBE 101st Birthday and Presentation

of Cigar Cutter to the Mayor(click here)

If you would like to know more about the Transporter Bridge visit  via the link  in Sites of Interest

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright © 2012 Friends of Tredegar House